All posts filed under: lessons

6 Most Valuable Life Lessons I’ve Learned

Originally posted on teenmusing:
Disclaimer: Some of these are fact. Some are conclusions I’ve reached that I believe to be true. Take these- as I hope you take everything- with a grain of salt. God is in control I am not the center of the universe You will never truly know the mind of another, but never stop trying to empathize Listen. To other people. To wisdom. To opposing viewpoints. To your own mind Keep your head in the clouds but don’t forget about where your feet are Think deeply. Form your own opinions. Research. Never be content to mindlessly follow others Just briefly, I’d like to elaborate on point number 6. We feel comfortable when we fit in. Often, we’re so caught up in doing what everyone else is doing that we forget to ask “why are we doing this?” One thing I’d like to see more in America is people asking why. The first thing we need to do is question things (the tax system, vaccinations, or the quality of McDonald’s food, for…

How Not to University: First Impressions

Originally posted on Pinkjumpers:
Having survived my first semester at university, albeit somewhat haphazardly, I like to think that I  have already learned a great number of things with regards to surviving the ‘outside world’. In what I hope will become something of a ‘how-to’ series, I will share my snippets of advice  alongside my first-hand woes that naturally stem from a girl who has yet to master the art of living smoothly. A lot can rest in first impressions- it is the difference between being ‘that intelligent female  who knows a lot about 17th century literature’ and being ‘that girl who parades around with yesterday’s lasagne stuck to her face’. And never are first impressions quite so important than when you start university; when every impression is both first and nightmarishly   immortal. It’s not breaking news to reveal that a drunken slobbery kiss the night before is a terribly awkward encounter in Tesco’s the day after. But even those ‘did I really lick his face last night?’ encounters do not compare to the events of…

Moving Away Part 1: How to Grad School

Originally posted on How Do I Grown Up:
As I’ve mentioned, I’m headed to grad school this month. No big deal, just casually moving from Seattle to New York City. About three months in to my two year Peace Corps term I decided to go to grad school when I got home and began obsessing. On my weekly trip to the capitol city, I would copy and paste page after page or poorly loaded content from university websites and compile them into guides on my computer. I got pretty into tables of contents. From there I would read through each guide, judging the school’s education program on three excel pages of factors, organized by priority. After a year and a half, I had a spreadsheet of over 40 schools. I applied for three. My point is that I had the time to obsess about grad school and systematically evaluate my options before picking the best fit. I then had enough time to take the GRE and apply for schools. Peace Corps was a blessing that taught me…

Do What You Love, Even When It Sucks

Originally posted on Ellie Hartleb:
Acclaimed sportswriter Red Smith said, “Writing is easy; you just open a vein and bleed.” As it turns out, Red was right — writing is a lonely, sometimes soul-sucking battle. Throughout my writing history, the main players have been myself, a pen, a legal pad and a laptop. After years of trying to master the craft, I have learned only a few things: Mastery is impossible, My best writing is first produced by hand in the middle of the night, and I love this, even when I hate it. On the eve of my fourth semester of college, I have realized that growing up to do what I love is more difficult (and more expensive) than I ever imagined. College has taken a lot of mental, physical and financial strain lately. It has both affirmed that my lifelong love of writing will one day be my full time job, and has made me question, more than ever, whether I really belong in this atmosphere. As it turns out, loving what I…

Don’t Go To College

Originally posted on How Do I Grown Up:
My senior year of high school, I was burned out, I was exhausted, I’d busted my butt in extracurriculars, carried an active social life and maintain pretty good marks for 13 years. I was ready for a break; college didn’t look all that appetizing. But my parents, my friends, and my teachers told me to just go to college. Go and experience. Go and learn. Go and be free. So I did. At the time there weren’t other options, or at least none that I knew about. I could go to college or I could live with my parents and work in town. All the great wise men told me that college would get me a career, it was the only thing that would. So I went. And I experienced. And I think I learned, though probably not what was on the syllabus. College was…not fun for me, it wasn’t a grand opening of my mind or an essential activity to my youth. It was certainly not…

Lessons Adulthood Taught Me

Originally posted on How Do I Grown Up:
I’ve learned a lot of things in my adult life; how to apply for (and actually get) jobs, how to BS my way through classes, and sometimes learn, how to parallel park. It’s been a journey. It’s what this blog’s all about. Here are a few lessons that have recently jumped out at me from their hiding places in my brain. When trying to decide if you should buy something, walk away for a while, distract yourself with something else for a few minutes, hours, days. If you still want it, go for it. Men’s shirts button the opposite way from women’s shirts. It’s always a good idea to keep important items in your purse and/or car. I keep febreeze, tweezers, floss, deodorant, chapstick and (my favorite) a snack, usually nuts or granola, in my car. I have used all of it several times. Boiling water can get candle wax out of fabric. Just dip the garment in the water in 15-20 second intervals until all traces…

Craft Beer: The Case of Value

Originally posted on Generation Y Retirement Account:
You may have discovered (in person, or online) that I have quite a love held for craft beer. Leave it to residing in the beautiful Pacific Northwest abundant with hops, or the fact that Portland is the U.S. city that has the highest amount of craft breweries per capita – there are several other reasons why I choose to fork out a little extra for the value I receive when choosing craft beer vs. macro-brewery options. Now, this isn’t to say that I scoff at the big guys in the industry…I just have more reasons as to why I go for supporting the craft beer industry. In fact, I’m not quite alone! According to a Time.com Money article, “43% of millennials say craft beer tastes better than mainstream brews…” and there’s a strong correlation of sales in the craft beer industry booming as millennials reach the age of 21+. Here are my 5 reasons to show the case of value for craft beer – cheers! (*insert beer mug emoji here*) 1. Craft…

Why Connect?

Originally posted on PRinspires:
One of Project Reverso, Inc.’s tenets is Connecting Communities, and sometimes we’re reminded of the importance of making a concerted effort to do so. But at times it can be difficult to find real-life ways to connect with others from other communities. Over the last few years I’ve personally made a commitment to be as uncomfortable as possible by stepping outside of the comforts of my own cultural status quo. By going on multiple service trips abroad to intentionally reaching out to persons in the LGBTQ community to become friends I’ve gained perspectives that I would have otherwise never had. This summer and fall semester I took the opportunity to host two English learning foreign exchange students; one this summer from Colombia and this fall from Japan.  Under what other circumstances would I have the opportunity to live with individuals from cultures and communities that are polar opposites from that in which I grew up in? One student even admitted to being afraid once he realized that I wasn’t a white male…

It’s Not All or Nothing

Originally posted on How Do I Grown Up:
Lately I’ve been diving into “Mountains Beyond Mountains,” a book about Dr. Paul Farmer who works with TB patients in Haiti. In Haiti, TB has been blamed for centuries on sorcery and Farmer finds himself frustrated, assuming that these patients will not trust modern medicine due to their conflicting beliefs. He realizes his mistake in talking to one elderly patient. She asks him “honey, are you incapable of complexity?” and he stands aghast at his ignorance. Because people can believe in two seemingly conflicting ideals. My father is a scientist, through and through, a man who looks for reason in everything. My father is a Christian, through and through, a man who lives in the undying faith of everything. They are different and sometimes conflicting but the two ideals can live in the same house. In Peru there are many non-medical beliefs that made my job with the Peace Corps difficult. I would tell a mother that her child was sick because of poor hygiene, she would say “no, no, he…