All posts filed under: Literature

A Subway With Its Own Library

Originally posted on cup of tea with that book, please:
Credit: The New York Times ? Ever left your house without your book and was facing a long commute to work? Now New Yorkers don’t have to face that dreaded outcome. The New York Public Library, Queens Public Library, and Brooklyn Public Library, in partnership with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) created a great reading project titled “Subway Library”, free ebooks for your ever daunting commute. These are free downloadable books excerpts or full text that can be accessed through the libraries’ e-reader app, the SimplyE. This is how it works: When you enter any subway station, connect to the Transit Wireless WiFi Once logged on, you’ll see a prompt to go and visit SubwayLibrary.com And start browsing! They have various categories ranging from “New York Stories” to “International Tales”. It also organized books for those rare quick commutes or long reads for that ever daily occurring long/delayed commutes. And don’t forget to lookout for the “library” train! This train has 10 subway cars covered to…

Swallow

Originally posted on LITERARY TITAN:
There are many words that can be used to describe the tale of Swallow by Heidi Fischer. Gripping. Moving. Heart-breaking. This fantastic story about a young woman in World War Two era Germany humanizes those who fought in the war in a way that is unexpected. Our story follows Gabi: a fierce, bright woman who stampedes her way onto the runway where she acts as an engineer and pilot. In a time where woman were beginning to make their mark on the world; a time when relations are strained and many outside the Nazi mantra failed to truly understand what was happening in their country. Gabi finds herself in all of this. The bright young woman who had her life altered so horrifically at the tender age of seven. The young woman who wants to do her father, a general, proud. Gabi shows us a Germany that many of us wouldn’t have believed existed. The desire of a young woman to fly. This book starts off with a bang and…

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Originally posted on Reading Every Night:
Title: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Author: J.K. Rowling Series: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, #1 Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group Release Date: November 18th 2016 Rating: J.K. Rowling’s screenwriting debut is captured in this exciting hardcover edition of the Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them screenplay. When Magizoologist Newt Scamander arrives in New York, he intends his stay to be just a brief stopover. However, when his magical case is misplaced and some of Newt’s fantastic beasts escape, it spells trouble for everyone… Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them marks the screenwriting debut of J.K. Rowling, author of the beloved and internationally bestselling Harry Potter books. Featuring a cast of remarkable characters, this is epic, adventure-packed storytelling at its very best. Whether an existing fan or new to the wizarding world, this is a perfect addition to any reader’s bookshelf. – Blurb courtesy of goodreads.com My Thoughts On… …The Plot “Tell me the truth—was that everything that came out of the case?” When the film…

Book Review: Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights by Salman Rushdie.

It didn’t take me too long to finish reading this strange and whimsical book here but while reading it, it did feel like it took me forever. I’m not sure if it was a psychological issue, since the title itself is all about time. Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights by bestselling author, Salman Rushdie, is about the unique relationship between a female jinn, Dunia, and a human male, a philosopher by the name of Ibn Rushd, which spanned centuries, and the brood they created came into existence with a special soul. They were as normal as you and me, holding down a job, gardening, owning a home and driving a car. They were as normal as the other human beings in the story. The only difference was their inner possession of a super power and the levitation that caused an uproar among their own kind. The book wasn’t all about Dunia and Ibn Rushd, though. It was also about the rest of the jinns and jinnias in the fairy world. I was amazed that my …

“Me Before You” Book, Movie, & Thoughts

Life According to Jamie Me Before You, a novel by Jojo Moyes was published four years ago and was made into a movie this year starring Emilia Clarke (queen of all our hearts on  Game of Thrones) and Sam Claflin (charming heartthrob from The Hunger Games and Love, Rosie). I wanted to read the book before I watched the movie and now that I’ve read the book and watched the movie I’m finally getting around to writing up my comparison and some other deep thoughts I’ve had about the story. So to briefly give you a synopsis of the storyline if you’re unfamiliar with it, the story is narrated by a mid-20s woman named Louisa (Lou for short). She lives in a small English town and after losing her job at a local cafe she finds a new job as a companion/caretaker of sorts to Will, a rich mid-30s man who… View original post 1,002 more words

Book Review: The Tea Planter’s Wife by Dinah Jefferies

When I saw this book on the fiction shelves in Borders, I knew I must have it. The cover was attractive enough, the back of the book told me enough to know roughly what the story would be about, and also because I’ve begun drinking tea (Lipton, to be exact) more so than coffee. Of course, what you read on the back of a book cover can barely tell you much but it can give you an inkling into what to expect from it. Where there is love and romance, there would be secrets and a likelihood of a betrayal or two. It was enough for me to pay for the book and leave. It took me four days to finish reading The Tea Planter’s Wife by Dinah Jefferies. Four days. It’s not as short as I thought, but for me, finishing a book in less than a week is a good achievement. The last time I ever recalled having finished reading an entire book in a day or two, or staying up way past midnight …

Write What You Know

Originally posted on The Sunflower Cafe:
Everyone knows that phrase uttered in every creative writing course. The famous, “write what you know.” This is solid advice for writers both new and experienced. My only problem is that people tend to take it at a face value. They assume they should only write about plots or settings that they know well. If that were the case, then fantasy and sci-fi wouldn’t exist. I doubt J. R.R. Tolkien truly experienced a trek to Mordor. Writing what you know doesn’t always have to be a place. Sometimes putting qualities you see in yourself or those around you into your characters is writing what you know. Sometimes looking at the way people speak to one another or the way emotions are handled in times of stress or happiness is writing what you know. To create a character who breathes, it helps to be perceptive on the way real people think and act. When I write, I tend to give my cast a few of my own flaws. This normally…

Book Review: The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George

A little delayed but here is the long-awaited book review of The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George that I had finally finished reading some time over the week. I must admit that the book was pretty damn amazing. Why? No matter how desperate I wanted to finish reading the book and keep up with my 2016 Goodreads Reading Challenge, I also wanted to take my time with it. It was quite a dilemma, indeed. What I liked about the book was the writing style. It was casually-written, injected with lots of bookish humour and dry sarcasm. The kind of dry Bitish wit that mocks your intelligence but you know they’re just kidding. They don’t mean to put you down or ridicule you. They just want to make you laugh. I also loved how literary it was, with the author leaving a smattering of bite-sized pieces of quotes in books written by dead (or still alive) bestselling authors. Monsieur Jean Perdu’s occupation as the literary apothecary, where he turned a little barge into his floating book clinic on the Seine, sealed my love for …

An Ode to Orgasms

Originally posted on The Lonely Tribalist:
O thou ravishing convulsions, Who lie dormant in the day,  And dream of freedom, honeyed revulsions, Yearning for your next lay. O thou bringer of joy and destroyer of woe,  It doth not matter how it occur; You care not if with friend or foe, If it’s sweet and intimate or merely a blur. The quivering. The quaking. The shivering. The shaking. Oh what’s that? Let you free? And you’ll promise me another three… Orgasms are awesome. Here’s some fun reading material on the big O: 10 Reasons You Should Have More Orgasms | Women’s Health What Happens When You Have an Orgasm? These 8 Awesome Health Benefits That Beat Going to the Gym Tonight | Bustle Here’s Why You Can’t Orgasm, According to Science | IFLScience The Female Orgasm Explained by Guys | Buzzfeed A-Z Challenge: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z [Header image source: Pixabay]