All posts filed under: Literature

It’s Gucci

Originally posted on lipstickzngunz:
I’ll be honest with you guys, I put Gucci in a category. I just knew this book was gonna be hood as the West End Mall. I was thinking I’d need a translator to cypher through the slang. Pre judgment at it finest. I’m only human. I was sorta surprised when I notice Gucci himself was the author; after the first few chapters I quickly learned why. Well duh Lipstickzngunz its La Flare is a hustler. Thats the long and short of it. Period. Neil Martinez-Belkin former music editor at XXL magazine lent his expert touch as well. I mean since he’s written a ton about hip-hop why wouldn’t he. The rollercoaster ride of Mr. Burrrrrr starts out with humble well sorta humble beginnings deep in Alabama before we end up at the Texaco or Sun Valley, and long before Gucci becomes Atlanta Trap God. We meet his family and learn the meaning behind the name. After all none of us calls him Radric. I learned a bunch. So many Atlanta…

Tested Tricks on Tackling Writer’s Block

Originally posted on The Musing Quill:
Whether writer’s block is real or not – totally depends on what you believe. Here was the article that debated what a writer thinks about writer’s block and it gained much popularity amongst readers back in December last year. I believe, that there are such stretches of time when you strive to scribe. Motivation plays a paltry role. It feels as though the pool of imagination inside you has dried out and you are merely scraping the bottom to no fruition. That may or may not be writer’s block or call it by any name you fancy, the fact remains that when the storm comes, we need not give in or seek escape. Tonight, thus, we talk of possible effective ways of tackling writer’s block. In my journey so far, I have always learnt new things and have gladly shared them with the writing fraternity through my blogs. But as a writer, where do I get my motivation? How do I look deeper into my perspectives? I realised, even…

Oathbringer

Originally posted on Life of Chaz:
Oathbringer by Brandon Sanderson Amazon – Oathbringer GoodReads – Oathbringer Author – Brandon Sanderson Dalinar Kholin’s Alethi armies won a fleeting victory at a terrible cost: The enemy Parshendi summoned the violent Everstorm, which now sweeps the world with destruction, and in its passing awakens the once peaceful and subservient parshmen to the horror of their millennia-long enslavement by humans. While on a desperate flight to warn his family of the threat, Kaladin Stormblessed must come to grips with the fact that the newly kindled anger of the parshmen may be wholly justified. Nestled in the mountains high above the storms, in the tower city of Urithiru, Shallan Davar investigates the wonders of the ancient stronghold of the Knights Radiant and unearths dark secrets lurking in its depths. And Dalinar realizes that his holy mission to unite his homeland of Alethkar was too narrow in scope. Unless all the nations of Roshar can put aside Dalinar’s blood-soaked past and stand together–and unless Dalinar himself can confront that past–even the restoration…

Books to Read For Black History Month

Originally posted on cup of tea with that book, please:
February is Black History Month, the time we celebrate all the achievements and accomplishments of black men and women. We should always celebrate the important acts of many African-Americans but this is time we really take the time to reflect on them. But unfortunately, many figures and events are missing from the history textbooks. Fortunately, there are great books out there, including the list here, that delve more into black history and open our eyes to the history makers we did not know exist. Discover the defining moments that made Black History Month such an important month to celebrate. Children Books The Youngest Marcher: The Story of Audrey Faye Hendricks, a Young Civil Rights Activist by Cynthia Levinson Meet the youngest known child to be arrested for a civil rights protest in Birmingham, Alabama, 1963, in this moving picture book that proves you’re never too little to make a difference. ? ? Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African-Americans by Kadir Nelson Told through the unique point of…

Spellbound by The Faerie Handbook

Originally posted on mailbox mermaid:
What could be a more appropriate distraction from my newfound fear of flying than The Faerie Handbook, a volume dedicated to winged creatures? It was with this logic that I toted this gorgeous, enormous tome in my carry-on luggage to Europe and back this past winter, hoping its lush pages might soothe my anxiety mid-flight. I waited in the terminal clutching it behind my boarding pass, too afraid to leave the book in my backpack and risk loosing access to it after the captain had turned back on the fasten seatbelts sign. I shouldn’t bury the lede: my air travels are less relevant than my general adoration for this book by the creators of Faerie Magazine. Still, its detailed, whimsical contents did indeed prove a panacea to some of my turbulence terrors…so that’s saying something! The Faerie Handbook is the sort of book that you’ll want to display – except perhaps not on a “coffee table” where it could run the risk of spilled-tea damage! I keep mine very visible but well-protected amid…

A Subway With Its Own Library

Originally posted on cup of tea with that book, please:
Credit: The New York Times ? Ever left your house without your book and was facing a long commute to work? Now New Yorkers don’t have to face that dreaded outcome. The New York Public Library, Queens Public Library, and Brooklyn Public Library, in partnership with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) created a great reading project titled “Subway Library”, free ebooks for your ever daunting commute. These are free downloadable books excerpts or full text that can be accessed through the libraries’ e-reader app, the SimplyE. This is how it works: When you enter any subway station, connect to the Transit Wireless WiFi Once logged on, you’ll see a prompt to go and visit SubwayLibrary.com And start browsing! They have various categories ranging from “New York Stories” to “International Tales”. It also organized books for those rare quick commutes or long reads for that ever daily occurring long/delayed commutes. And don’t forget to lookout for the “library” train! This train has 10 subway cars covered to…

Swallow

Originally posted on LITERARY TITAN:
There are many words that can be used to describe the tale of Swallow by Heidi Fischer. Gripping. Moving. Heart-breaking. This fantastic story about a young woman in World War Two era Germany humanizes those who fought in the war in a way that is unexpected. Our story follows Gabi: a fierce, bright woman who stampedes her way onto the runway where she acts as an engineer and pilot. In a time where woman were beginning to make their mark on the world; a time when relations are strained and many outside the Nazi mantra failed to truly understand what was happening in their country. Gabi finds herself in all of this. The bright young woman who had her life altered so horrifically at the tender age of seven. The young woman who wants to do her father, a general, proud. Gabi shows us a Germany that many of us wouldn’t have believed existed. The desire of a young woman to fly. This book starts off with a bang and…

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Originally posted on Reading Every Night:
Title: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Author: J.K. Rowling Series: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, #1 Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group Release Date: November 18th 2016 Rating: J.K. Rowling’s screenwriting debut is captured in this exciting hardcover edition of the Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them screenplay. When Magizoologist Newt Scamander arrives in New York, he intends his stay to be just a brief stopover. However, when his magical case is misplaced and some of Newt’s fantastic beasts escape, it spells trouble for everyone… Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them marks the screenwriting debut of J.K. Rowling, author of the beloved and internationally bestselling Harry Potter books. Featuring a cast of remarkable characters, this is epic, adventure-packed storytelling at its very best. Whether an existing fan or new to the wizarding world, this is a perfect addition to any reader’s bookshelf. – Blurb courtesy of goodreads.com My Thoughts On… …The Plot “Tell me the truth—was that everything that came out of the case?” When the film…

Book Review: Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights by Salman Rushdie.

It didn’t take me too long to finish reading this strange and whimsical book here but while reading it, it did feel like it took me forever. I’m not sure if it was a psychological issue, since the title itself is all about time. Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights by bestselling author, Salman Rushdie, is about the unique relationship between a female jinn, Dunia, and a human male, a philosopher by the name of Ibn Rushd, which spanned centuries, and the brood they created came into existence with a special soul. They were as normal as you and me, holding down a job, gardening, owning a home and driving a car. They were as normal as the other human beings in the story. The only difference was their inner possession of a super power and the levitation that caused an uproar among their own kind. The book wasn’t all about Dunia and Ibn Rushd, though. It was also about the rest of the jinns and jinnias in the fairy world. I was amazed that my …

“Me Before You” Book, Movie, & Thoughts

Life According to Jamie Me Before You, a novel by Jojo Moyes was published four years ago and was made into a movie this year starring Emilia Clarke (queen of all our hearts on  Game of Thrones) and Sam Claflin (charming heartthrob from The Hunger Games and Love, Rosie). I wanted to read the book before I watched the movie and now that I’ve read the book and watched the movie I’m finally getting around to writing up my comparison and some other deep thoughts I’ve had about the story. So to briefly give you a synopsis of the storyline if you’re unfamiliar with it, the story is narrated by a mid-20s woman named Louisa (Lou for short). She lives in a small English town and after losing her job at a local cafe she finds a new job as a companion/caretaker of sorts to Will, a rich mid-30s man who… View original post 1,002 more words