All posts tagged: books

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Originally posted on Reading Every Night:
Title: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Author: J.K. Rowling Series: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, #1 Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group Release Date: November 18th 2016 Rating: J.K. Rowling’s screenwriting debut is captured in this exciting hardcover edition of the Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them screenplay. When Magizoologist Newt Scamander arrives in New York, he intends his stay to be just a brief stopover. However, when his magical case is misplaced and some of Newt’s fantastic beasts escape, it spells trouble for everyone… Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them marks the screenwriting debut of J.K. Rowling, author of the beloved and internationally bestselling Harry Potter books. Featuring a cast of remarkable characters, this is epic, adventure-packed storytelling at its very best. Whether an existing fan or new to the wizarding world, this is a perfect addition to any reader’s bookshelf. – Blurb courtesy of goodreads.com My Thoughts On… …The Plot “Tell me the truth—was that everything that came out of the case?” When the film…

Book Review: Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights by Salman Rushdie.

It didn’t take me too long to finish reading this strange and whimsical book here but while reading it, it did feel like it took me forever. I’m not sure if it was a psychological issue, since the title itself is all about time. Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights by bestselling author, Salman Rushdie, is about the unique relationship between a female jinn, Dunia, and a human male, a philosopher by the name of Ibn Rushd, which spanned centuries, and the brood they created came into existence with a special soul. They were as normal as you and me, holding down a job, gardening, owning a home and driving a car. They were as normal as the other human beings in the story. The only difference was their inner possession of a super power and the levitation that caused an uproar among their own kind. The book wasn’t all about Dunia and Ibn Rushd, though. It was also about the rest of the jinns and jinnias in the fairy world. I was amazed that my …

“Me Before You” Book, Movie, & Thoughts

Originally posted on Life According to Jamie:
Me Before You, a novel by Jojo Moyes was published four years ago and was made into a movie this year starring Emilia Clarke (queen of all our hearts on  Game of Thrones) and Sam Claflin (charming heartthrob from The Hunger Games and Love, Rosie). I wanted to read the book before I watched the movie and now that I’ve read the book and watched the movie I’m finally getting around to writing up my comparison and some other deep thoughts I’ve had about the story. So to briefly give you a synopsis of the storyline if you’re unfamiliar with it, the story is narrated by a mid-20s woman named Louisa (Lou for short). She lives in a small English town and after losing her job at a local cafe she finds a new job as a companion/caretaker of sorts to Will, a rich mid-30s man who was involved in a horrible accident and left a paraplegic. Understandably, when Lou first meets Will he is taciturn, bitter, and generally an unhappy person…

Write What You Know

Originally posted on The Sunflower Cafe:
Everyone knows that phrase uttered in every creative writing course. The famous, “write what you know.” This is solid advice for writers both new and experienced. My only problem is that people tend to take it at a face value. They assume they should only write about plots or settings that they know well. If that were the case, then fantasy and sci-fi wouldn’t exist. I doubt J. R.R. Tolkien truly experienced a trek to Mordor. Writing what you know doesn’t always have to be a place. Sometimes putting qualities you see in yourself or those around you into your characters is writing what you know. Sometimes looking at the way people speak to one another or the way emotions are handled in times of stress or happiness is writing what you know. To create a character who breathes, it helps to be perceptive on the way real people think and act. When I write, I tend to give my cast a few of my own flaws. This normally…

What to Pack for a 3-Day Getaway

Have you ever wondered what to pack for a three-day vacation, only to realise that you have over-packed your bags despite planning early and ahead of time? Yeah, that happens to me quite frequently. Also, I don’t travel often so mistakes are inevitable. For every five websites I visited, each would tell me the necessary clothing I should bring on my three-day vacation, from swimsuits to evening gowns. But they rarely ever touch on what are the activities and/or hobby items that you can pack when you’re away for only a handful of days.

I’m Already Mentally Casting Emma Cline’s The Girls

Originally posted on Sorry Television:
On paper, Emma Cline is the kind of girl I want to punch. A?stylish waif with a successful?middle-part and piercing blue eyes. The owner of a near-monochromatic wardrobe that’s both simple and defiant in?its simplicity. The recipient of a $2 million advance, at the age of 25, for her first book (and two to come),?the end result of a bidding war between 12?major publishers. The author of a debut novel whose film rights were snapped up by Scott Rudin before the?manuscript even sold. Cline is living a charmed life, a romantic-comedy-set-in-Manhattan kind of life, an I-live-in-a-shed-for-the-novelty-of-it kind of life. I want to find her wherever she’s tapping away on her laptop at twee essays for vaunted?literary magazines and punch her right below that middle-part. There’s only one problem with this plan—several, if you count the unlikelihood?of my finding her shed or her even still living in the shed, or my managing to punch anyone in the face, arguably?unprovoked, without consequence. The problem is that The Girls, the novel loosely based…

Station Eleven Made Me Man-Cry A Little Inside

Originally posted on Kin S. Law:
Is it possible to write an epilogue for the world? That was the feeling I got, anyway, from the much acclaimed Station Eleven, a book only about 330 pages long but took me months to read. I got it for Christmas. It’s not that I’ve been busy, which I have, it’s just that the book gives you what can only be accurately called “the feels.” You can’t take too much of it at one time, like a cocktail that’s a little bit too bitter and doesn’t trick you into thinking it’s juice. Mmm… where was I? In Station Eleven, Emily St. John Mandel weaves together the spoiler for the last page of the world. Civilization is dead from a pandemic called the Georgia Flu, and the survivors gather in the aftermath to begin the arduous task of life without electricity, gas, or internet (NOOOOOOOO…) The story is woven around the pivotal character of Arthur Leander, a movie and theater actor who dies on stage almost on the day the world…

The Rose and the Dagger (Renée Ahdieh)

Originally posted on My Tiny Obsessions:
The much anticipated sequel to the breathtaking The Wrath and the Dawn, lauded by Publishers Weekly as “a potent page-turner of intrigue and romance.” I am surrounded on all sides by a desert. A guest, in a prison of sand and sun. My family is here. And I do not know whom I can trust. In a land on the brink of war, Shahrzad has been torn from the love of her husband Khalid, the Caliph of Khorasan. She once believed him a monster, but his secrets revealed a man tormented by guilt and a powerful curse — one that might keep them apart forever. Reunited with her family, who have taken refuge with enemies of Khalid, and Tariq, her childhood sweetheart, she should be happy. But Tariq now commands forces set on destroying Khalid’s empire. Shahrzad is almost a prisoner caught between loyalties to people she loves. But she refuses to be a pawn and devises a plan. While her father, Jahandar, continues to play with magical forces…

Discussion Post: Characters With Absent Parents

Originally posted on A frolic through fiction:
Now, I apologize in advance if this discussion seems slightly more like a rant on my part. But I’ve discovered that I actually have quite a lot to say about this topic. Not long ago, someone talked about this topic, and when commenting on their post, I saw that I was actually quite passionate about this – rant wise. I have a lot to say, and I need to get it out there somehow, so this is the topic of today’s discussion post. So let’s talk about characters with absent parents! I feel like every single protagonist in most YA books is missing either one of both parents. And I just want to know…WHY??? Why on earth has it become a book trope for someone to be missing their parents? I find it so wrong that it’s been written this way so often that it’s actually a trope now! I feel like lately, people just write out the parents of the protagonist for convenience. Because how inconvenient would…