All posts filed under: business and finance

10 Innovative Personal Finance Tips

Originally posted on Generation Y Retirement Account:
We see articles often about the most innovative companies, the most innovative technology, the most innovative fitness routines…why not the most innovative money tips? One thing I really dig about personal finance is consistency. There are many teachings & rules that were true in the past that are still applicable today. You really can’t doubt him when Warren Buffet states: “Do not save what is left after spending, but spend what is left after saving.” Buffet is now 85 years old and is worth $61.8 billion dollars. Whoa.  I had to take a minute to let that sink in again… When you start to read & learn more about personal finance, you start to recognize patterns. Lot’s of them. This is great though! Repetition really allows you to learn about a subject that may seem like completely unfamiliar terrain. Unfortunately, if we are not exposed to personal finance teachings in our youth we have to play an immense amount of catch-up in our adulthood. Since personal finance is…

Would You Date Someone With Debt?

This is a question that many of us don’t think about, or some may think too heavily upon. To some, bringing up the topic of whether or not someone has any debts conjures feelings of shame, denial, and a sense of intrusion into one’s personal space or even resentment. To others it may be a neutral topic. One that is well received without reservation or apprehension. Why do we respond differently to the same question? I have no idea. I am not a psychologists, nor do I study psychology in any great detail but the stark difference in how topics surrounding money are dealt with in relationships, especially debt, has to make you wonder. What are we really afraid off? So maybe the question is not that simple. Maybe this is an impregnated question. Would you date someone with debt? What type of debt is acceptable and what type of debt is not? How much debt is too much debt? Is student loan debt and mortgage debt acceptable, but not credit card or line of…

Why I choose to rent…for now at least

Ever since my husband and I became debt free, most people in our circle of friends and family keep asking us when we are going to buy a house. It’s a very reasonable question as most people our age (early 30’s) are getting married, buying homes and making babies. The truthful answer to this is, I don’t know and I am in no rush. After grinding away for 2.5 years to pay off $120,000 of debt, the last thing on my mind right now is to get into more debt. Now I know the argument that mortgage debt is good debt, but that is beside the point. Where I stand personally in my life right now, debt is debt. Yes, I agree good debt (if there is such a thing) provides you with a better interest rate and increases your long term assets (sometimes), but your still on the hook to pay it back and that’s what I want to avoid right now. The feeling of owing anyone, anything. I know this feeling will probably…

Money & Essentialism

Originally posted on Generation Y Retirement Account:
This past Friday, I finished a book entitled Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown (selected by my new company’s book club)! It was a fast & incredibly relevant read. (P.S. If you’ve been to my corner of the internet a few times, you’ll start to recognize that books serve as a major source of inspiration for my posts). Today I’m bringing a breakdown of Essentialism, overall life, and how this all correlates to money & personal finance. More and more the rapidity of life, technology and pursuit of success seems to overwhelm individuals. I can attest to this…from shaping my resume & refining my GPA in high school and college, to graduating and feeling like I am constantly huffing and puffing to keep in stride with life. After leaving several years of life at the educational institute level, it suddenly seems like you are back to square one. Regardless of how equipped you may be with the knowledge you acquired in school/university, nothing can quite prepare…

Just Get Rid of the Debt Already…

I know of so many people that refuse to tackle their student loan debt because they don’t feel that it’s their responsibility to do so. Some of the reasons, include: “I never got to work in the field that I studied so why should I pay back the debt?” (you and 70% of the population…welcome to LIFE) “They should have never lent me that much money. Nobody told me it would be this hard. So why should I pay it back?” (you are an adult so start acting like one) “I’ll just earn the bare minimum so the government can pay for my interest while I reduce my principal.” (so you’re going to let student loans dictate your career plans as well…) “I’ll just wait 6 or 7 years then apply for bankruptcy.” (bankruptcy is not your answer, work is) I know I am coming off as snarky but it bugs me when capable, able people are not taking responsibility for their own past decisions. When did our society become so entitled? Having a lot…

Malleable Money Mindset

Originally posted on Generation Y Retirement Account:
At age 5… I didn’t quite know that money was even real. Life consisted of hanging out at the playground on the monkey bars during recess & learning to share brightly colored Crayola crayons with my classmates. Life just happened, and innocence carried all of us youngins’ along. At age 10… I surpassed the years of experiencing that it’s ‘great to be 8,’ and it’s ‘fine to be 9.’ Those years didn’t quite phase me anymore because I reached the big ol’ double digit ages. I couldn’t wait to become a teenager with a beeper on my hip, and take on a J-O-B. I completed chores around the house to earn an allowance from my parents. Most purchases were trinkets, toys, and posters to decorate my room (because boy bands were sooo dreamy). At age 15… I landed my first job in high school. Wait, scratch that – two jobs! I finally hit that high responsibility phase I dreamed of when I was younger. I was earning my own…