All posts filed under: human interactions

The Internet Is Making Us Lonely

Originally posted on Rosie Culture:
Likes, favorites, retweets, comments, and all those weird emotion things Facebook just added. We live for instant gratification. It’s not because we’re selfish, it’s because of the Internet. It’s because we not only have to look great in person but we also have to look great online. There is more than one impression to make and you never know when you are going to have to make it. You know when you’re going out to a bar to meet up with all your friends and look for cute guys. But, you never know when someone’s going to request you as a friend on Facebook or follow you on Insta. You could make a great first impression in person, but might totally bomb when your first impression online is break up quotes and pictures of wine. It always looks like everyone else is having so much fun. They add all of their vacation pictures to an album for the world to see. They Instagram the amazing brunch they’re having that Saturday…

Here’s What I Mean When I Say “Pro Black Doesn’t Mean Anti-White”

Originally posted on Black Millennials:
To be pro-Black does not mean to be anti-white. To be pro-Black means to be anti-white supremacy. I wrote these words in a piece about interracial dating some months ago. The piece argues that being pro-Black means to affirm Black bodies, spirit, and culture while denouncing the evils of white supremacy as unnatural, deadly, and unsustainable. Pro-Blackness is a value system that demands the centering of Black people in a structural world designed by the white ruling corporatist class. Some elements of pro-Blackness posit the belief that white supremacy must be thoroughly destroyed for everlasting Black survival. Upon writing that piece, I’ve seen and heard many — mostly Black folk — similarly express that the pro-Black value system does not ultimately condemn “all” white people, just the omnipotent network of institutions, structures, systems, and constructs derived from white supremacist ideology, and the individual agents that empower them. From social media feeds to think pieces, I’ve seen these expressions manifested in digital space. In the physical realm, I’ve seen nonprofit professionals try to embed the sentiment in grant proposals.…

To The Boy Who Was Never My Boyfriend

Originally posted on Rosie Culture:
To: you. Even when you set boundaries and even when you make rules – everything and anything can be broken. It always starts out so simple. Physical. Easy. But emotions tip toe their way in and create a large and tangled mess. I was left with so many pieces and you still seemed whole. You seemed fine, like you didn’t care at all. Did you care at all? You weren’t my boyfriend – I wouldn’t have ever dared to call you my boyfriend. But we laughed a lot and we kissed a lot. And sometimes you’d put your arm around my shoulders at a party. And sometimes you’d tell me how much you liked me. But did you even like me at all? Nothing was ever defined so we were free to do as we pleased. No emotions and no ties. But there were so many emotions and broken ties by the end of it. There was an end, but I’m not sure there was ever a beginning. Some days…

It’s Not All or Nothing

Originally posted on How Do I Grown Up:
Lately I’ve been diving into “Mountains Beyond Mountains,” a book about Dr. Paul Farmer who works with TB patients in Haiti. In Haiti, TB has been blamed for centuries on sorcery and Farmer finds himself frustrated, assuming that these patients will not trust modern medicine due to their conflicting beliefs. He realizes his mistake in talking to one elderly patient. She asks him “honey, are you incapable of complexity?” and he stands aghast at his ignorance. Because people can believe in two seemingly conflicting ideals. My father is a scientist, through and through, a man who looks for reason in everything. My father is a Christian, through and through, a man who lives in the undying faith of everything. They are different and sometimes conflicting but the two ideals can live in the same house. In Peru there are many non-medical beliefs that made my job with the Peace Corps difficult. I would tell a mother that her child was sick because of poor hygiene, she would say “no, no, he…