All posts filed under: Finances

4 Vital Points for a Cheaper Japan Travel

Originally posted on Stylishwanderer.com:
Japan has an image of being one of the most expensive countries in the world, and if you’re staying in hotels, eating out, and traveling around a lot, then it can really cost you a bomb. It is never going to be as cheap as other destinations and while it may be an expensive country to visit, there are plenty of ways to make this country affordable. To me, budget travel is value travel. So, I have listed 4 vital points on how you can cut down the costs and make this country affordable: 1.) TRANSPORTATIONTransportation is one of the most expensive aspects of travel in Japan and this will surely eat up your pennies. The bullet train, while awesome, comfortable, and fast, is not cheap at all. Individual rail journey can cost hundreds of dollars when added altogether. So in order to reduce your train costs, get a Japan Rail (JR) pass.I repeat, do get a JAPAN RAIL PASS and here’s my BIG NOTE: You only can buy this pass outside of Japan and only people on…

How to Deal with Money Personality Differences in Relationships

We are all created differently. Our differences is what helps us grow, change and adapt. By learning from each other, we not only see the importance of relationships, but appreciate others strengths as they help us in building our weaknesses. Your strength may be someone else’s weaknesses and many times we tend to be attracted to people that complement our strengths and weaknesses. Money is no different. Generally speaking, we can categorize people into groups: saver and spender. I hate grouping people, or making generalizations, but in some circumstances like these, it will have to do. Of course not all spenders are bad with managing their money and saving, and not all savers are hoarders of cash and hate to spend. With that being said, I will generalize and conclude that in my household, I am the saver in the relationship and Mr. MMC is the spender. This has its benefits and drawbacks of course. As I learn each day to let go of some coin from time to time (…okay I am not that…

7 Days, 7 Tips: Budget Travel #7 (Track Your Spending).

Originally posted on Heart of a Traveller:
It’s already the final post of this series; it’s gone so fast! I thought I would keep one of my best tips for last; keep track of your spending. Now, if you a listing fanatic like me, this might come natural to you. I love to make “to do” lists, to keep track of pretty much everything in my life with lists, including the money I spend. If you’re not anything like that, trust me on this; keeping note of how much you spend whilst travelling will help you stick to your budget. When you write down how much you spend, you become more concious of it. You might realise that you’re spending too much on a certain thing, and you can then adjust accordingly. It’s up to you how you keep track of your spending. You could take note of everything you spend money on, but this can become tedious and you’re then more likely to stop doing it. Personally, I keep track of every time I…

What it Would Cost Us to Buy a $500k Home

Ok. So this is probably the longest post I have done so far so bear with me. Now that we are debt free, the questions we keep getting asked from family and friends is ‘when are we going to buy a place of our own?’ My natural reaction to this question is to say ‘can I get some breathing room please…we just paid off $120k in 2.5 years and are building our savings while having some fun’. But instead I say ‘we will see, we are not in a hurry’. And that is pretty much the truth. I think I highlighted some of the reasons why my husband and I are content with renting for now in my previous post. Some of the benefits we get out of renting include: Being able to save 30%-43% of our take home pay each month towards both short & long term savings like our ETFs, DRIPS (dividend income is the best), mutual funds with low MERs, GIC’s and basic savings account. This percentage does not include the 5%…

How to Save Money for Travel Even if You’re Flat Broke and Living Paycheck to Paycheck

Originally posted on roamwildandfree:
“There was nowhere to go but everywhere, so just keep on rolling under the stars.” – Jack Kerouac Long-term traveling is a lifestyle that is more feasible than one may think. Today we live in a society where it’s quite common to live outside our means, acquire debt, live paycheck to paycheck and not be financially stable. Alex and I aren’t rich monetarily. We don’t have some ghost of a backer funding our travel. We’re not sponsored. But we somehow manage to travel at least 8 months out of every calendar year. How do we do it? It’s simple. We are simple people who live simple lives and prioritize so that we can roll around in our 16 year old van drifting with the wind living a life we believe in. In love with life at Canyonlands National Park. ? If you’re serious about wanting to travel long-term, read on for all our money-saving tricks!!  ? EATABLES Stop buying drinks. And I mean anything that isn’t water. Included in this is alcohol,…

Why We Have HSAs and You Should Too!

Originally posted on Millennials making cents of money:
Health Savings Accounts (HSA) are one of the most misunderstood parts of employee benefits today. HSAs are individually owned bank accounts that work in conjunction with your health plan – your health plan does have to be HSA compatible, traditionally referred to as high deductible health plans (HDHP). Don’t be afraid of ‘high deductible’ – yes, we understand that you could pay more out of pocket. But hopefully, as a healthy young person, you don’t have high out of pocket health care costs.  And if you do, simply save your receipts and pay yourself back at any time. We covered a lot of the basic HSA info in an earlier post, check it out here. Sp why do we think it’s a good financial move for millennials to have an HSA? You get tax-deferred treatment! Be aware of the annual limits, but any money you contribute (through employee payroll deductions or direct deposits) are eligible deductions. Your HSA stays with you when you change jobs, so you…

10 Reasons Why You Should Get Rid of Your Student Loan Debt Quickly

It’s funny the things you remember when you are younger, which at the time you feel have no significance. I remember sitting in my Grade 12 calculus class, it was the final semester before high school graduation. By then, everyone had picked out their schools and had either been accepted or not. The feeling of independence, a sense of accomplishment and the eagerness to experience college/university life had filled the classroom. I then distinctly remember my teacher talking about how we would all probably need to get a student loan to attend post-secondary, how he just finished paying off his student loan last month and how it took him over 12 years to pay off. Although I did not have any understanding about personal finance back then, there was something really depressing about his comment. Granted he wasn’t an old teacher. He was probably in his early 40’s but when you are 17-18 years old….that’s old. I remember thinking to myself, 12 years to pay off a student loan, that’s crazy. He never told us…

10 Innovative Personal Finance Tips

Originally posted on Generation Y Retirement Account:
We see articles often about the most innovative companies, the most innovative technology, the most innovative fitness routines…why not the most innovative money tips? One thing I really dig about personal finance is consistency. There are many teachings & rules that were true in the past that are still applicable today. You really can’t doubt him when Warren Buffet states: “Do not save what is left after spending, but spend what is left after saving.” Buffet is now 85 years old and is worth $61.8 billion dollars. Whoa.  I had to take a minute to let that sink in again… When you start to read & learn more about personal finance, you start to recognize patterns. Lot’s of them. This is great though! Repetition really allows you to learn about a subject that may seem like completely unfamiliar terrain. Unfortunately, if we are not exposed to personal finance teachings in our youth we have to play an immense amount of catch-up in our adulthood. Since personal finance is…

11 Ways to Save on School

Rent a book or buy used. Talk to students in your program that have taken the classes you want to take and buy the books from them. Or buy the books for cheap at online stores like Amazon or AbeBooks.com Sell your books right away when your done with the semester. Post an ad on campus, sell them to the bookstore or to a friend. You may end up getting pennies on the dollar for what you spent but it’s better to get something for them than nothing. If you have the grades, become a Teaching Assistant or tutor in your school during the year.  They pay well above minimum wage, you get to refresh the material you already learned by teaching others & you get paid to do it. Of course if you have an internship during the school year that is even better. Apply for scholarships, bursaries and grants in your school. Visit your schools financial aid’s office and also check out helpful sites like Scholarship Canada  for scholarships being offered that you…

Would You Date Someone With Debt?

This is a question that many of us don’t think about, or some may think too heavily upon. To some, bringing up the topic of whether or not someone has any debts conjures feelings of shame, denial, and a sense of intrusion into one’s personal space or even resentment. To others it may be a neutral topic. One that is well received without reservation or apprehension. Why do we respond differently to the same question? I have no idea. I am not a psychologists, nor do I study psychology in any great detail but the stark difference in how topics surrounding money are dealt with in relationships, especially debt, has to make you wonder. What are we really afraid off? So maybe the question is not that simple. Maybe this is an impregnated question. Would you date someone with debt? What type of debt is acceptable and what type of debt is not? How much debt is too much debt? Is student loan debt and mortgage debt acceptable, but not credit card or line of…