All posts filed under: book review

Book Review: Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights by Salman Rushdie.

It didn’t take me too long to finish reading this strange and whimsical book here but while reading it, it did feel like it took me forever. I’m not sure if it was a psychological issue, since the title itself is all about time. Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights by bestselling author, Salman Rushdie, is about the unique relationship between a female jinn, Dunia, and a human male, a philosopher by the name of Ibn Rushd, which spanned centuries, and the brood they created came into existence with a special soul. They were as normal as you and me, holding down a job, gardening, owning a home and driving a car. They were as normal as the other human beings in the story. The only difference was their inner possession of a super power and the levitation that caused an uproar among their own kind. The book wasn’t all about Dunia and Ibn Rushd, though. It was also about the rest of the jinns and jinnias in the fairy world. I was amazed that my …

“Me Before You” Book, Movie, & Thoughts

Originally posted on Life According to Jamie:
Me Before You, a novel by Jojo Moyes was published four years ago and was made into a movie this year starring Emilia Clarke (queen of all our hearts on  Game of Thrones) and Sam Claflin (charming heartthrob from The Hunger Games and Love, Rosie). I wanted to read the book before I watched the movie and now that I’ve read the book and watched the movie I’m finally getting around to writing up my comparison and some other deep thoughts I’ve had about the story. So to briefly give you a synopsis of the storyline if you’re unfamiliar with it, the story is narrated by a mid-20s woman named Louisa (Lou for short). She lives in a small English town and after losing her job at a local cafe she finds a new job as a companion/caretaker of sorts to Will, a rich mid-30s man who was involved in a horrible accident and left a paraplegic. Understandably, when Lou first meets Will he is taciturn, bitter, and generally an unhappy person…

Book Review: The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George

A little delayed but here is the long-awaited book review of The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George that I had finally finished reading some time over the week. I must admit that the book was pretty damn amazing. Why? No matter how desperate I wanted to finish reading the book and keep up with my 2016 Goodreads Reading Challenge, I also wanted to take my time with it. It was quite a dilemma, indeed. What I liked about the book was the writing style. It was casually-written, injected with lots of bookish humour and dry sarcasm. The kind of dry Bitish wit that mocks your intelligence but you know they’re just kidding. They don’t mean to put you down or ridicule you. They just want to make you laugh. I also loved how literary it was, with the author leaving a smattering of bite-sized pieces of quotes in books written by dead (or still alive) bestselling authors. Monsieur Jean Perdu’s occupation as the literary apothecary, where he turned a little barge into his floating book clinic on the Seine, sealed my love for …

I’m Already Mentally Casting Emma Cline’s The Girls

Originally posted on Sorry Television:
On paper, Emma Cline is the kind of girl I want to punch. A?stylish waif with a successful?middle-part and piercing blue eyes. The owner of a near-monochromatic wardrobe that’s both simple and defiant in?its simplicity. The recipient of a $2 million advance, at the age of 25, for her first book (and two to come),?the end result of a bidding war between 12?major publishers. The author of a debut novel whose film rights were snapped up by Scott Rudin before the?manuscript even sold. Cline is living a charmed life, a romantic-comedy-set-in-Manhattan kind of life, an I-live-in-a-shed-for-the-novelty-of-it kind of life. I want to find her wherever she’s tapping away on her laptop at twee essays for vaunted?literary magazines and punch her right below that middle-part. There’s only one problem with this plan—several, if you count the unlikelihood?of my finding her shed or her even still living in the shed, or my managing to punch anyone in the face, arguably?unprovoked, without consequence. The problem is that The Girls, the novel loosely based…

Station Eleven Made Me Man-Cry A Little Inside

Originally posted on Kin S. Law:
Is it possible to write an epilogue for the world? That was the feeling I got, anyway, from the much acclaimed Station Eleven, a book only about 330 pages long but took me months to read. I got it for Christmas. It’s not that I’ve been busy, which I have, it’s just that the book gives you what can only be accurately called “the feels.” You can’t take too much of it at one time, like a cocktail that’s a little bit too bitter and doesn’t trick you into thinking it’s juice. Mmm… where was I? In Station Eleven, Emily St. John Mandel weaves together the spoiler for the last page of the world. Civilization is dead from a pandemic called the Georgia Flu, and the survivors gather in the aftermath to begin the arduous task of life without electricity, gas, or internet (NOOOOOOOO…) The story is woven around the pivotal character of Arthur Leander, a movie and theater actor who dies on stage almost on the day the world…

Book Review #71 – I Am Malala, by Malala Yousafzai and Christina Lamb

Originally posted on Cat's Shelf:
Hello guys! It’s time for another non-fiction review. I bring you I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban (pt. Eu, Malala: A minha luta pela liberdade e pelo direito à educação), by Malala Yousafzai and Christina Lamb. Get this title from Book Depository Once child, one teacher, one book and one pen can change the world. If you’re a feminist, like myself, you’re most likely aware of Malala’s work and a bit of her story already. She is a Pakistani girl who always fought against the Taliban oppression in her region, specially against their wrong ideals of preventing girls from getting educated. In 2012, Malala was shot in the head by the group and had to flee her country, living now in England but still continuing her activism. In this book, she tells her story, right from the beginning of it all. I really admired Malala before starting this and I’m glad to say that reading this book only made me admire and…

The Boy Most Likely To by Huntley Fitzpatrick // Much Cuteness & Much Teenage Angst

Originally posted on Book Enthral:
3 stars – I liked it but maybe there where elements of the book I didn’t enjoy to much and subtracted from the awesomeness. I may have also had a bit of a meh reaction to it. Surprises abound and sparks ignite in the highly anticipated, utterly romantic companion to My Life Next Door Tim Mason was The Boy Most Likely To: – find the liquor cabinet blindfolded – need a liver transplant – drive his car into a house Alice Garrett was The Girl Most Likely To: – well, not date her little brother’s baggage-burdened best friend, for starters. For Tim, it wouldn’t be smart to fall for Alice. For Alice, nothing could be scarier than falling for Tim. But Tim has never been known for making the smart choice, and Alice is starting to wonder if the “smart” choice is always the right one. When these two crash into each other, they crash hard. Then the unexpected consequences of Tim’s wild days come back to shock him. He finds…

Book Review #66 – Breakfast at Tiffany’s, by Truman Capote

Originally posted on Cat's Shelf:
Hey guys! Today’s post is going to be about Breakfast at Tiffany’s, by Truman Capote. Buy this book from Book Depository Recently I read another of Capote’s books, In Cold Blood (I posted my review here) and I totally feel in love with his writing. But before that, I found this beautiful (and super cheap, I might add) copy of Breakfast at Tiffany’s at a flea market, so I just bought it without thinking a lot. Unless you live under a rock, you’ve probably heard about the movie with the same name as this book, staring Audrey Hepburn. I mean, that’s probably what most people think about when they hear the tittle. Of course, this book contains that, but it’s not all. It also contains other short stories, like House of Flowers, A Diamond Guitar and A Christmas Memory. From what I can understand, most editions of this book contain the four stories. I read this when I was at a particular busy time in school but that didn’t stop me from…

Remembrance- Meg Cabot

Originally posted on The Daydreaming Bookworm:
“I’ve been seeing the souls of the dead who’ve left unfinished business on earth for as long as I can remember.”- Suze, Remembrance Title: Remembrace Author: Meg Cabot Series: The Mediator Publication Date: February 2, 2016 Publisher:?William Morrow Links: Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Book Depository *I received an ARC from Edelweiss?in exchange for an honest review. * Synopsis via Goodreads:?In REMEMBRANCE, the seventh installment of the Mediator series, all Susannah Simon wants is to make a good impression at her first job since graduating from college (and becoming engaged to Dr. Jesse de Silva). But when she stumbles across an ancient murder, old ghosts—and ex-boyfriends—aren’t all that come back to haunt her. REMEMBRANCE will be the first ever adult installment of the Mediator, published by William Morrow, the adult division of HarperCollins, the company that brought you the YA books in the series. I was not feeling the cover at first, but now it’s kind of growing on me. It’s been six years since Suze…