All posts filed under: change

Nothing Lasts Forever…Not Even Your Favorite Take Out Place.

Originally posted on the boston gayllennial:
A few nights ago I watched Unzipped, the Isaac Mizrahi documentary on Netflix, and it was really great. Because I sort of came of age in the aughts I wasn’t really aware of how truly up there he was in the fashion world back in the 90s. The documentary follows the making of his critically acclaimed fall 1994 collection (when I was two!), from sketch pad to runway. It’s wildly interesting, in part because fashion shows are a dime a dozen these days in New York and hardly ever as special as they used to be, but that’s not my point. Towards the end of the film you see Mizrahi walking down 6th avenue in ecstasy, having made the fashion world go wild for the collection that was such a nightmare to put together. And then, out of nowhere I see him walk right past Charlie Mom. Charlie Mom was the first restaurant that I ate in when I moved to New York for school and, at 18, my mother, father,…

Thoughts on Flexibility, Change, and Habit

Originally posted on Carrying on Endlessly:
“It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the ones most responsive to change. ” ~Charles Darwin Most people learn about the concept of evolution and survival of the fittest in high school biology. I have always found the concept interesting; that the living things that prevail are the ones that are able to adapt based on their circumstances. It is also interesting to think about this concept in terms of human nature and everyday life. We know that animals have evolved over time as the ones equipped for change survive, but what about people? Can our attitudes toward inevitable change evolve? Have we grown more accustomed to change over time, or are we consistently the same in terms of our inflexibility? I think about these questions in a more abstract sense (of course we have adapted to changes in our physical environments and the natural world, we are here after all). For example, how we adapt to change brought about by the…

Who You Were Before You Lost Your Innocence

Originally posted on Rosie Culture:
Losing your innocence is just a side effect of growing up. There’s no one certain thing that causes it. It doesn’t automatically go away when you turn 13 or when you lose your virginity or when you get dumped for the first time. It all varies from person to person, from age to age, from experience to experience. And it fades out slowly. When I was around 11 years old I asked my mom why everyone had cancer all of a sudden. She told me cancer has always been around, I was just realizing it now. That’s a very specific moment when I can remember something changing inside of my brain. Looking back now, can you really pinpoint the moment you stopped being naive and started getting real? Probably not. You have to reach the point in your life when you look back and realize you’ve changed. Because change isn’t something you see until you’re so different you don’t recognize yourself anymore. Your old memories barely belong to you. I’m…

Interviewsday: Employment Edition

Originally posted on How Do I Grown Up:
In light of recently being fired, I sat down with one of my favorite coworkers ever, Francis, who, as I mentioned quit without notice after I was asked to leave.* Francis is not only one of the most talented human beings I’ve ever met, but also such a deeply kind individual. It is impossible to meet her and not instantly fall in love with her. So, I interviewed her about the ins and outs of bad jobs, when to get out, and what a good job should look like. Here we go! (And don’t forget to check Francis’ awesome movie blog out here) How Do I Grown Up: I suppose we could say it’s been a whirlwind week for both of us. You had  a lovely vacation with a wonderful boyfriend, only to come back to total chaos. How’re you feeling about everything? Francis: I am honestly feeling much better today than Thursday morning when I got your text saying that you had just been fired. As you mentioned I had…

Berlin Fashion Week Features Pieces Made for and Modeled by Dwarfs

Originally posted on Painting On Scars:
(Image © Valerie Diedenhofen used with permission) ? It’s been a good week in the media for dwarfs. Not only did Peter Dinklage’s Emmy win allow for him to speak out once again against bullying, but Fashion Week just ended in the city I call home and I couldn’t help but squeal a little “OMG!” at seeing history being made. With her collection “At Eye Level,” Berlin-based designer Sema Gedik presented clothes made for and modeled by Laura Christ, Mick Mehnert, Eva Ehrmann and others with dwarfism. Gedik was inspired to do so after observing the difficulty of finding clothes that fit—not to mention stylish ones—faced by her cousin Funda, who has achondroplasia. That the fashion industry has never seemed interested in offering dwarfs clothing made for their bodies imbued Gedik with “an intense feeling of injustice.” She tells Berlin’s Tageszeitung, “Fashion should not be restricted by social conventions.” But those restrictions are there, which is why she reports being surprised that she even managed to get the project…

Trump gives out Graham’s cellphone number

Originally posted on The Generation Me: GOP presidential candidates Donald Trump and Lindsey Graham. (AP) Donald Trump got back at frequent critic Lindsey Graham on Tuesday in a very Trump-ish way: He gave out the South Carolina senator’s cellphone number. Speaking at a town hall in Graham’s home state of South Carolina, the businessman-turned-presidential-candidate urged the crowd to call the state’s senior senator. “Give it a shot,” Trump said in Bluffton, S.C. “Your local politician, you know? He won’t fix anything but at least he’ll talk to you.” Read more…

Tech Tuesday: The Tippy Tap

Originally posted on globally aware millennial:
Every year, over 3.5 million children die from diarrhea or acute respiratory distress. The most poignant part of this figure is that these deaths are almost entirely preventable, simply by ensuring that each person in a community is practicing proper hygiene. Studies find that handwashing with soap before eating or cooking and after using the toilet can lower diarrhea induced deaths by more than 40% and acute respiratory infections by 23%. In developing countries, people are less likely to wash their hands at critical moments, thus spreading disease in a myriad of ways. The problem with practicing proper hygiene is generally due to an availability of fresh running water, awareness of handwashing benefits, a lack of understanding of how illness spreads, and uncultivated hygiene habits. But how do you convince entire groups of people to start washing their hands? Photo Credit: tippytap. Meet the Tippy Tap, a simple and innovative way to get people to wash their hands when it’s most crucial to do so. The technology is easy to…

Prioritizing Then & Balancing Now

There are two specific times in my life that I realized how important it was for me to prioritize: spring semester senior year and now (one year after graduating). Senior Year: Spring Semester For the record, I’ve always done my best to prioritize, but senior year spring semester my skills were put to the test. Being an active member of my college community (which meant being over involved) I had to cut back in order to focus on postgraduate plans. One afternoon I received a call from an individual that had the audacity to lecture me over my choice to work on a group project and future endeavors versus participating in an event for an extracurricular activity. I used logic to prioritize the circumstance. I chose to attend college to get a degree, the extracurricular activities were a perk that would not make or break (emphasis on break) my ability to get a job. I didn’t pay $160k for extracurriculars. My priorities, in order, were my education, internships, anything related to film/TV (due to my career choice), and …