All posts filed under: adventure

City Guide: Adelaide

Originally posted on travelux:
Adelaide might be one of the most underrated cities in Australia. Even if some people might say that Adelaide isn’t worth a visit, I would fully disagree. In this city guide, I’ll present why I feel that visiting Adelaide is well worth it! You can find more content about Adelaide on our city page! Visiting Adelaide also means managing expectations to some degree. It’s not that Adelaide doesn’t have beautiful spots, but the city center is just as phenomenal as in other cities. When it comes to Adelaide, you just have to look a little further for the real highlights. Central Business District The actual city center of Adelaide is the so-called Central Business District, which is a very artificial area with straight streets and the typical blocs. The city center just doesn’t feel like a city that grew by itself. The medium-high skyscrapers don’t make it a lot better either. Nevertheless, the CBD is well worth visiting for a couple of hours as there are quite some nice historic buildings. The…

Cottony Clouds Over my Paradisaical Workplace

Originally posted on Thoughts, Tales, and Whatnot:
While out on my morning walk/jog, I chanced on this view and couldn’t help but marvel at the cloud-filled sky. Usually, our skies are just shades of blue with a scattering of cottony clouds here and there. Here’s a zoomed-in shot. I actually had to wade into the waters to take the above, but I had no regrets.  The scenery looked so pretty!  I even stopped my morning routine and just lounged around while enjoying the serene views. This one’s taken on the roadway fronting Galapagos Beach.  The clouds here weren’t so defined, but I loved how the palm trees reflected on the still lagoon waters. On my way back to my room, my view of a cloud-filled sky was just as pronounced from the back lobby. Photos taken at Plantation Bay Resort and Spa using a Samsung Galaxy Note 5, which by the way is now my favorite mobile camera because it takes photos in wider angles than my iPhone 6.

The Magic Place from Transylvania

Originally posted on Ramona Crisstea:
It is as magical as I am telling you. There are beautiful places everywhere you go around Transylvania and every single one of them should be explored. We must learn to enjoy, protect and cherish these places. If the nature gives us as a gift it’s beauty we must also protect it and show the world that we have such a beautiful country full of unique landscapes and traditions. The magic is found in every colour of the landscape which reminds of our childhood and the beautiful memories with our grandparents or all the adventures with the childhood friends. Most of the times we forget about those moments, we leave aside the childhood memories and we focus our life on the urban part that is very difficult and stressful. From time to time we must remember that the past landscapes are still existing in our country and we must appreciate them. This is just a part of my magical Transylvania countryside. #crissteanature ♥ I wore a beautiful yellow skirt designed…

Driver/Passenger

Originally posted on Maggie Grace:
I was a little late to get my driver’s license, waiting until the summer before college. A mean instructor the previous December had made me cry and I avoided driving lessons for months until I realized there wouldn’t really be a better time to do this. I had spent the last two years of high school taking the bus home from school and being driven around town by my friends. I love the passenger seat of a car. All those used Honda Civics and Toyota RAV4s  (and one 1992 BMW) blend together now, but I loved the sound of a car pulling into my parents drive way. I loved climbing into the passenger seat as my friend shoved all her bags and receipts and water bottles into the back to make room for me. I loved not worrying about whether we were taking the fastest route or whether there would be a good parking spot close to Panera. Eventually I got my license and brought my grandfather’s old Chevy Prizm…

Iceland’s Westfjords: The Road Less Taken

Originally posted on Reverse Retrograde:
Many tourists come to Iceland with the goal of ‘doing the Ring Road.’ They want to drive around Route 1 all the way, starting and ending in Reykjavik. Unfortunately for many of them, this does not include the Westfjords. The place is remote, and even some Icelanders have not visited. The upper lefthand corner of Iceland holds its own ‘ring road,’ a network of highways, tunnels, and gravel that makes a full loop if driven from Búðardalur. We went North on the first day, ending up in Súðavík. On the we stayed there two nights, and then moved on through to Þingeyri . On the last day we drove to Bjarkarholt Guesthouse, which isn’t even on Google’s maps most of the time. We completed the loop the next day, 1300km later.  The Road Less Taken is one of my favorite poems, and one which I used this year to say ‘bye-bye’ to my Chinese students. It makes a lot of sense in terms of my life and how I choose to travel, but also in…

Transportation in Delhi

Originally posted on travelux:
Transportation in Delhi is one of the biggest problems of the city till today. However, the last years have been a vast improvement. Nowadays, there are five different lines as well as an express line to the airport. Besides the metro, there are also buses, taxis and rickshaws on the streets of Delhi. Delhi as well as most other Indian cities, is reached the easiest by train. There are several train stations in the city with connections to all parts of India. While trains are generally a good way to get around in India, there are also some difficulties and several other problems including the low speed. Trains in India are extremly slow To get more information about train travel in India, be sure to check out our guide about train travel in India! However, it is not very recommendable for tourists and visitors to use commuter trains in Delhi as safety and the lack of information in English are a serious problem. Metro in Delhi The backbone of transportation in Delhi…

Destination: Manarola, Italy

Originally posted on The Finicky Cynic:
Postcard Snapshot #4: Manarola, Italy Manarola. Situated between Corniglia and Riomaggiore, the village of Manarola surprised me by offering more than I had expected, especially as the second-smallest town in the Cinque Terre. It was the last village that I visited on my trip, as I had taken the train over to Riomaggiore, then hiked over to Manarola from there with a Malaysian girl (let’s call her “Naomi”) whom I had met two nights before at a restaurant. While the two villages (Riomaggiore and Manarola) aren’t as far apart from each other as the one between Monterosso and Vernazza, the trail is more challenging. Literally, you are climbing the face of the mountain, as the steps often times required a huge leg (and hand) up! Definitely was sweating like crazy at the end of it. Hike from Riomaggiore to Manarola. Made it to Manarola and explored the village. As we were arriving, I felt a bit disappointed at the aesthetics of it, as the houses didn’t appear to be…

Starfish Island, Puerto Princesa

Originally posted on TRAVELLING THE WORLD SOLO:
As much as I loved exploring the Puerto Princesa Underground River, to do so required me to do a lot of waiting around, which is fine, but it meant that by the next morning I was eager to spend the day up and moving! The other main appeal of Puerto Princesa is the Honda Bay area – a collection of small tropical islands easily accessible from Puerto Princesa City Proper. You can hire a boat, but unless you already have a decent sized group ready and raring to go, it will be more cost effective to take a day tour. Costing around 1400 pesos ($39) with lunch included, it certainly isn’t an expensive day out! The first stop on the three island day tour was by far my favourite. Named Starfish Island – it doesn’t take long to figure out how this particular island got its name! There are so many Starfish littering the shallow waters surrounding this tiny island! Some Starfish preferred to hang out in the…

Sniffing Through Istanbul’s Spice Bazaar

Originally posted on The 9 to 5 Wanderer:
Istanbul’s Spice Bazaar is a foodie’s dream come true. The covered market is lined with vendors selling spices, teas, dried fruits, and Turkish desserts. Mounds of jewel colored spices and teas line the walls of the market, and dried clusters of herbs and loofahs are strung up from the ceilings. The different aromas create an intoxicating scent that wafts through the narrow alleys of the bazaar. Sold by the kilo, “love teas” promise to serve as an aphrodisiac, “relaxing teas” to destress. There are also a variety of more conventional teas such as jasmine tea and black teas, for the less adventurous. The carefully formed mountains of spices include pure spices like saffron, cumin, and oregano, as well as “chicken spice”, “meat spice” and “salad spice” blends. (What is salad spice?) The Spice Bazaar also sells a number of sweets, dried fruits, and nuts. We bought some chicken spice and Turkish tea from one shopkeeper, and then from a smiling Syrian man who had been working at the Spice…

Travelling with Your Parents

I’ve been in Australia for almost two weeks now and overall it’s been amazing. I landed in Queensland to see the sights (and my grandparents) and fell in love with Brisbane. Then I went to Murwillumbah, with its beautiful misty mountains, and am heading down to Byron bay pretty soon. It’s been a lot of fun and made me seriously want to buy tie dye haram pants and backpack in youth hostels for at least a year asap, but there is one catch.