All posts filed under: analysis

5 Skills You Should Consider Adding To Your Resume

As history demonstrates, the working force is constantly changing. Given the technology of our current age, there are a few skills you should strongly consider adding to your resume.

Discussion Post: Characters With Absent Parents

Originally posted on A frolic through fiction:
Now, I apologize in advance if this discussion seems slightly more like a rant on my part. But I’ve discovered that I actually have quite a lot to say about this topic. Not long ago, someone talked about this topic, and when commenting on their post, I saw that I was actually quite passionate about this – rant wise. I have a lot to say, and I need to get it out there somehow, so this is the topic of today’s discussion post. So let’s talk about characters with absent parents! I feel like every single protagonist in most YA books is missing either one of both parents. And I just want to know…WHY??? Why on earth has it become a book trope for someone to be missing their parents? I find it so wrong that it’s been written this way so often that it’s actually a trope now! I feel like lately, people just write out the parents of the protagonist for convenience. Because how inconvenient would…

OkCupid – The Deep End

Originally posted on Date By Number:
OkCupid analyzes its users’ data and publishes insights in The Deep End. Their recent article takes a look at the changes from 2005 to 2015, with some surprising results, staring with this question: It’s a dramatic drop, but my first reaction was that this could be a reflection of online dating becoming more common, rather than a major shift in sexual behavior. Maybe in 2005, online dating wasn’t as mainstream and OkCupid users tended to be more ‘adventurous’. Now that online dating is more common, the 2015 OkCupid users might include more conservative daters than it did before.  I thought my theory was pretty plausible, until I reached the following question: Any guesses as to why the two questions are trending in the opposite direction? You can find the whole article here. —- For more on OkCupid, see also: Hall of OkStupid #3 at The Lonely Tribalist

The Roles of Art

Originally posted on The Politics of Writing:
I find it interesting in the way art almost entirely reflects the artist. Of course this seems obvious, but there’s also unintentional ways it reflects the artist. This is noticeable when you take a writer who doesn’t make an outline for their writing. If they begin to just write and see what comes out, it almost always expresses subtle traits of the writer. The tone they use, the events they portray, the characters they establish, it all reveals their subconscious feelings. This is why when you’re done reading a good book you feel as if you personally know a writer because of how much of their personality you’ve picked up. After consuming all forms of art, paintings, writing, music, ect, you begin to notice a trend in topics. The universal themes artists are usually to make a point or to get the audience to feel a certain way. Themes like war, conflict, relationships, money, and nature are used to guide the audience to the conclusion the artist intended.…

Unfair Stereotypes

Originally posted on Storytime with John:
Just a random thought here…and, well…you may not completely  understand…but…I feel I may as well pose the question anyway ~ do you think perhaps that animals are a little annoyed by all of the stereotypes linked to them? That maybe they too are sick of the boxes they are often pushed into since birth?  It’s like…they get no choice in the matter – society just straight away dictates what they should like, and not like… We’re brainwashed into thinking from a very early age that rabbits love carrots, and that monkeys love bananas – but what if that reckoning was only brought about by some skewed, and limited market research…the same kind that often crops up with things like: ‘New study suggests men prefer watching movies, as opposed to reading – I know we only asked twenty people, but from this we can make huge quantum leaps, and over-generalise’ – or you know, words to that effect… Listen what I’m trying to say is that maybe, just maaaaaybe – not all rabbits love…

Shortsighted Critiques of Technology and Generational Bias

Originally posted on Millennial Evangelical: “All those young people and their technology. When are the just going to get their noses out of their phones and be with people in real life?” —Parents, 10 years ago, when their kids were Facebook and before they ran their kids off of it Remember when parents used to criticize their kids for being on their phones too much? Nowadays, I get more game requests and other annoying notifications from people my parents’ age than I do people my age. Throughout history, younger generations have been more apt to adopt a new technology than older generations. It’s just a fact of life. Often, older generations then deride younger generations for being too obsessed with technology, only to later be obsessed with it themselves (Facebook and FarmVille, anyone?). Read more…