All posts filed under: money

How to Save Money for Travel Even if You’re Flat Broke and Living Paycheck to Paycheck

Originally posted on roamwildandfree:
“There was nowhere to go but everywhere, so just keep on rolling under the stars.” – Jack Kerouac Long-term traveling is a lifestyle that is more feasible than one may think. Today we live in a society where it’s quite common to live outside our means, acquire debt, live paycheck to paycheck and not be financially stable. Alex and I aren’t rich monetarily. We don’t have some ghost of a backer funding our travel. We’re not sponsored. But we somehow manage to travel at least 8 months out of every calendar year. How do we do it? It’s simple. We are simple people who live simple lives and prioritize so that we can roll around in our 16 year old van drifting with the wind living a life we believe in. In love with life at Canyonlands National Park. ? If you’re serious about wanting to travel long-term, read on for all our money-saving tricks!!  ? EATABLES Stop buying drinks. And I mean anything that isn’t water. Included in this is alcohol,…

10 Innovative Personal Finance Tips

Originally posted on Generation Y Retirement Account:
We see articles often about the most innovative companies, the most innovative technology, the most innovative fitness routines…why not the most innovative money tips? One thing I really dig about personal finance is consistency. There are many teachings & rules that were true in the past that are still applicable today. You really can’t doubt him when Warren Buffet states: “Do not save what is left after spending, but spend what is left after saving.” Buffet is now 85 years old and is worth $61.8 billion dollars. Whoa.  I had to take a minute to let that sink in again… When you start to read & learn more about personal finance, you start to recognize patterns. Lot’s of them. This is great though! Repetition really allows you to learn about a subject that may seem like completely unfamiliar terrain. Unfortunately, if we are not exposed to personal finance teachings in our youth we have to play an immense amount of catch-up in our adulthood. Since personal finance is…

What Makes a Woman Confident?

Originally posted on Just another millennial living with her parents:
I feel as though this is a popular topic to discuss. The topic of confidence. I don’t speak to men, when it comes to matters of confidence – Ladies, I’m telling you – They have enough. Men, men, are so flipping confident these days. I tell you, I’ve never met a single male, anywhere, that hasn’t told me what to do. They tell me what I should be doing with my time. Of course, I shouldn’t be wasting so much time, worrying about my student loans – But I do. It’s all I can think about. I go hard, get what’s mine, take what’s mine. I work hard these days, and I must tell you, confess to you, ladies – My confidence is directly related to my money. These days, I feel a lot of pep in my step. I’ve bolstered up my student loan payments, and I feel good. Actually, I feel great. I’ve traded in my butter knife for a tomahawk, and I’m…

11 Ways to Save on School

Rent a book or buy used. Talk to students in your program that have taken the classes you want to take and buy the books from them. Or buy the books for cheap at online stores like Amazon or AbeBooks.com Sell your books right away when your done with the semester. Post an ad on campus, sell them to the bookstore or to a friend. You may end up getting pennies on the dollar for what you spent but it’s better to get something for them than nothing. If you have the grades, become a Teaching Assistant or tutor in your school during the year.  They pay well above minimum wage, you get to refresh the material you already learned by teaching others & you get paid to do it. Of course if you have an internship during the school year that is even better. Apply for scholarships, bursaries and grants in your school. Visit your schools financial aid’s office and also check out helpful sites like Scholarship Canada  for scholarships being offered that you…

5 Things You Should Know About Student Loan Debt

When I think back to when I was in Grade 12 gearing up for university, it seems so long ago. Who knew the decisions I made then regarding my finances (and some that where inevitable due to my circumstances) would continue to impact and shape me as the person I am today. To save future post-secondary students or current ones from getting into more student debt than they need to, I have compiled a short list of what I learned from incurring so much student debt. If you have to take out ‘more’ student loan to complete your undergraduate degree outside of your hometown, it’s probably a bad idea. I understand that some students would like to go to a school outside of their city because it’s well known for the program they want to take. Others may just want to leave the nest egg. However, in most cases the added debt needed to finance this decision exceeds the economic benefit they actually get once their out of school. This was not an option for…

Why I choose to rent…for now at least

Ever since my husband and I became debt free, most people in our circle of friends and family keep asking us when we are going to buy a house. It’s a very reasonable question as most people our age (early 30’s) are getting married, buying homes and making babies. The truthful answer to this is, I don’t know and I am in no rush. After grinding away for 2.5 years to pay off $120,000 of debt, the last thing on my mind right now is to get into more debt. Now I know the argument that mortgage debt is good debt, but that is beside the point. Where I stand personally in my life right now, debt is debt. Yes, I agree good debt (if there is such a thing) provides you with a better interest rate and increases your long term assets (sometimes), but your still on the hook to pay it back and that’s what I want to avoid right now. The feeling of owing anyone, anything. I know this feeling will probably…

Moving Away Part 1: How to Grad School

Originally posted on How Do I Grown Up:
As I’ve mentioned, I’m headed to grad school this month. No big deal, just casually moving from Seattle to New York City. About three months in to my two year Peace Corps term I decided to go to grad school when I got home and began obsessing. On my weekly trip to the capitol city, I would copy and paste page after page or poorly loaded content from university websites and compile them into guides on my computer. I got pretty into tables of contents. From there I would read through each guide, judging the school’s education program on three excel pages of factors, organized by priority. After a year and a half, I had a spreadsheet of over 40 schools. I applied for three. My point is that I had the time to obsess about grad school and systematically evaluate my options before picking the best fit. I then had enough time to take the GRE and apply for schools. Peace Corps was a blessing that taught me…

5 Things That Make Me Happy

Originally posted on The Modern Reality:
Family My family has always been a big part of my life. They’re always there for me and vise versa. I don’t know what I would do without them, especially my parents. They’ve given me the opportunities to be who I am today. They taught me things and understand my growth, supporting me and encouraging me. I am forever grateful for my parents and family. Making People Laugh I’d like to think I’m a pretty funny person, only because that’s what people tell me. The joy I get from hearing someone’s laughter is so heartwarming. I’m not really a pranker. I’m more of a crack jokes type of person. And if were really cool and understanding with each other, we might occasionally have a hilarious roast session. Money They say money doesn’t buy you happiness, but I say BS! Now obviously too much money might not necessarily be a good thing. I couldn’t imagine winning the lottery. I would never want that amount of money in one lump sum.…

Flexible Philanthropy Fund

Originally posted on Generation Y Retirement Account:
Philanthropy. Long word. Kind of funny sounding. Incredibly profound effects. So what exactly is philanthropy?  According to dictionary.com: “altruistic concern for human welfare and advancement, usually manifested by donations of money, property, or work to needy persons, by endowment of institutions of learning and hospitals, and by generosity to other socially useful purposes.” In other words: the dollars you donated to the local animal shelter, those moments you volunteered in your child’s classroom, that 5K you ran down Greek row to raise awareness for CARDV, or the times you spent serving hot meals at The Salvation Army…those are all acts of philanthropy. I condone philanthropy on a regular basis & maintain practicing acts of philanthropy as often as I can – but it is especially prevalent around the holidays. During the winter when the weather gets colder, warm thoughts & kind actions towards others from all walks of life are especially important. I know that you often hear a designated percentage of your budget should be allocated towards philanthropy &…

How to Know You’re Getting Old in 8 Ways

Originally posted on How To Get Things Done in 10 Ways:
Obviously, I know, that at age 25 I am not old. I have a lot of life left and to fret about being old this early in the game is stupid. But sometimes I just look at things and think, “Oh God, am I getting old? I would never do that.” I can just feel the aging in moments like that.?Oh maybe that’s what they call maturing?! Maybe I am finally maturing! Wow, now I feel so fancy after that realization. Okay, so for the purpose of this post we’re going to stick with the idea that I’m getting old… 1. Talking in the movie theater The boyfriend and I went to see a movie a little bit ago, and the theater was pretty empty except for this group of teens and a few couples sprinkled throughout. Those kids had something to say at EVERY damn scene! I mean, when I was a kid, yeah, I liked to talk to my friends during the movie,…