All posts filed under: Arts and Entertainment

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Originally posted on Reading Every Night:
Title: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Author: J.K. Rowling Series: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, #1 Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group Release Date: November 18th 2016 Rating: J.K. Rowling’s screenwriting debut is captured in this exciting hardcover edition of the Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them screenplay. When Magizoologist Newt Scamander arrives in New York, he intends his stay to be just a brief stopover. However, when his magical case is misplaced and some of Newt’s fantastic beasts escape, it spells trouble for everyone… Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them marks the screenwriting debut of J.K. Rowling, author of the beloved and internationally bestselling Harry Potter books. Featuring a cast of remarkable characters, this is epic, adventure-packed storytelling at its very best. Whether an existing fan or new to the wizarding world, this is a perfect addition to any reader’s bookshelf. – Blurb courtesy of goodreads.com My Thoughts On… …The Plot “Tell me the truth—was that everything that came out of the case?” When the film…

Netflix and Chill: Chewing Gum

Originally posted on The Collective:
? Edited by The Collected Mutineer ***A spoiler free review*** Chewing Gum Review: “Bless Us One and All, Oh Great and Benevolent Queen Bey” This six-episode comedy premiered in the UK on television last year, but Netflix acquired the rights to broadcast as an exclusive in other countries, and boy, am I glad. The cheeky humor, diverse cast and realistic portrayal of sex, religion and relationships (familial and otherwise) in Chewing Gum make it a sleeper hit of the season. During American Thanksgiving, I sat down with my Netflix account determined to watch something that wasn’t a Russian documentary or hockey related, and settled on Chewing Gum. Set in the U.K. housing complex (Tower Estates), the main character, Tracy, is touted as a Beyonce-obsessed shop girl looking to get laid, which, let’s be honest, is right up my alley. Still, the show is about more than blessed Queen Bey; there are issues of class, race, sexuality and religion that make each 22 minute episode stark and laugh-out-loud funny. Led by Michaela Coel, writer and creator of the original play Chewing…

Film Review – Your Name (2016)

Originally posted on Jordan and Eddie (The Movie Guys):
Mitsuha wakes to find herself crying Your Name (Kimi no na wa) Written and directed by Makoto Shinkai (5 Centimetres Per Second) Voice acting by Ryûnosuke Kamiki, Mone Kamishiraishi Review by Jordan “Once in a while when I wake up. I find myself crying.” If movie magic is the transformative ability to create a world other than this one, filled with life and beauty to capture the imagination in ways only dreams could create, then Your Name is the most magical movie of all time. Emotionally satisfying, as it surveys the landscape of love and longing by way of teen romance, comedy and celestial drama before scaling the heights of fate, Makoto Shinkai’s latest film uses its delicately drawn characters to introduce us to strangers who switch places in their sleep, setting rules for what they’re able to do and keeping a diary of the day they’ve steered. Mitsuha lives with her younger sister and grandma at a temple in the rural town of Itomori, weighed down by the expectations of being…

The Renaissances

Originally posted on NEORENAISSANCE MAN:
The Renaissance drenched the roots of a dull Feudal Europe with magic and let it blossom into the most beautiful flower Earth had ever seen. It was man’s Yellowstone, a colossal cultural explosion that stormed the lands for thousands of miles. It catapulted art, science, literature, architecture, and philosophy far beyond their perceived boundaries. Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Raphael—three dynamic polymaths whose aggregated effect on mankind boils every century—fought to be the most perfect genius ever. Machiavelli and Thomas More resurrected Greek Thinkers, using their ideas to critique present governments. Intellectuals gradually composed modern science. Accounting was invented, and knowledge-based economics flourished. Brunelleschi—another of the many polymaths—created his Duomo. Columbus sailed West. Education poured into the masses. The Gutenberg Press started mass communication, AKA what I do. The Renaissance has stirred the world in every second of the last 600 years—especially throughout 2016. Pictured at Kauai’s northern tip, I have really soaked up my 2016—literally and figuratively. The Renaissance and I are in a serious relationship. A history major, I’m fascinated by the origins…

Book Review: Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights by Salman Rushdie.

It didn’t take me too long to finish reading this strange and whimsical book here but while reading it, it did feel like it took me forever. I’m not sure if it was a psychological issue, since the title itself is all about time. Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights by bestselling author, Salman Rushdie, is about the unique relationship between a female jinn, Dunia, and a human male, a philosopher by the name of Ibn Rushd, which spanned centuries, and the brood they created came into existence with a special soul. They were as normal as you and me, holding down a job, gardening, owning a home and driving a car. They were as normal as the other human beings in the story. The only difference was their inner possession of a super power and the levitation that caused an uproar among their own kind. The book wasn’t all about Dunia and Ibn Rushd, though. It was also about the rest of the jinns and jinnias in the fairy world. I was amazed that my …

Willow Gathering: The Southern Retreat

A few days ago, before the air became too cold and the wind to fast, we gathered in a garden for a day-long Creative Retreat.   I had the honor of co-hosting this beautiful Willow Gathering event with my studio-mate, Julie Dodds (a super talented floral designer and travel enthusiast). Our vision for this retreat (and every other retreat or workshop we host) is to create an environment that is restful and nourishing; full of nature, art, peace, and time to rejuvenate. Something intangible and transformative happens when you allow your mind a moment of space to create – and the freedom to try something new.  With that quiet goal tucked in our minds, we spent the day learning new artistic kills, lingering over a French-inspired handmade-dinner, and enjoying refreshing drinks and each other’s company as the light faded over the garden and the warm bonfire took its place. ? During the afternoon Julie taught a workshop of floral arranging with a natural, modern aesthetic and I offered instruction in watercolor painting; merging art and nature within monochromatic organic paintings. The comradery…

“Me Before You” Book, Movie, & Thoughts

Originally posted on Life According to Jamie:
Me Before You, a novel by Jojo Moyes was published four years ago and was made into a movie this year starring Emilia Clarke (queen of all our hearts on  Game of Thrones) and Sam Claflin (charming heartthrob from The Hunger Games and Love, Rosie). I wanted to read the book before I watched the movie and now that I’ve read the book and watched the movie I’m finally getting around to writing up my comparison and some other deep thoughts I’ve had about the story. So to briefly give you a synopsis of the storyline if you’re unfamiliar with it, the story is narrated by a mid-20s woman named Louisa (Lou for short). She lives in a small English town and after losing her job at a local cafe she finds a new job as a companion/caretaker of sorts to Will, a rich mid-30s man who was involved in a horrible accident and left a paraplegic. Understandably, when Lou first meets Will he is taciturn, bitter, and generally an unhappy person…

Book Review: The Tea Planter’s Wife by Dinah Jefferies

When I saw this book on the fiction shelves in Borders, I knew I must have it. The cover was attractive enough, the back of the book told me enough to know roughly what the story would be about, and also because I’ve begun drinking tea (Lipton, to be exact) more so than coffee. Of course, what you read on the back of a book cover can barely tell you much but it can give you an inkling into what to expect from it. Where there is love and romance, there would be secrets and a likelihood of a betrayal or two. It was enough for me to pay for the book and leave. It took me four days to finish reading The Tea Planter’s Wife by Dinah Jefferies. Four days. It’s not as short as I thought, but for me, finishing a book in less than a week is a good achievement. The last time I ever recalled having finished reading an entire book in a day or two, or staying up way past midnight …

Write What You Know

Originally posted on The Sunflower Cafe:
Everyone knows that phrase uttered in every creative writing course. The famous, “write what you know.” This is solid advice for writers both new and experienced. My only problem is that people tend to take it at a face value. They assume they should only write about plots or settings that they know well. If that were the case, then fantasy and sci-fi wouldn’t exist. I doubt J. R.R. Tolkien truly experienced a trek to Mordor. Writing what you know doesn’t always have to be a place. Sometimes putting qualities you see in yourself or those around you into your characters is writing what you know. Sometimes looking at the way people speak to one another or the way emotions are handled in times of stress or happiness is writing what you know. To create a character who breathes, it helps to be perceptive on the way real people think and act. When I write, I tend to give my cast a few of my own flaws. This normally…

Film Review – War Dogs (2016)

Originally posted on Jordan and Eddie (The Movie Guys):
Title – War Dogs (2016) Director – Todd Phillips (The Hangover) Cast – Miles Teller, Jonah Hill, Bradley Cooper, Ana de Armas, Kevin Pollak Plot – The true story of best friends David Packouz (Teller) and Efraim Diveroli (Hill) who through bizarre circumstances found themselves winning an arms supply contract with the American government and therefore becoming “war dogs”. “This isn’t about being pro-war. This is about being pro-money” Review by Eddie on 23/08/2016 With one of those true life stories that you’d never believe had it not actually happened at its disposal, Old School and The Hangover director Todd Phillips and his capable duo of Miles Teller (in need of a hit) and the scenery chewing Jonah Hill (going all method on us) make War Dogs an entertaining and quick-fire experience that shines a light on an interesting aspect of White House law and how strange our modern warfare has become. A dark comedy filled to the brim with deplorable and colourful characters, language and…