All posts tagged: social justice

Lessons I Learned from #BlackLivesMatters

Originally posted on Joshua Lawrence Lazard:
A Sunday morning Facebook post asked “Is Black Lives Matter still a thing?” and I immediately did an eye-roll. The technical answer is in the affirmative. They still are a thing. I still get emails from them. I also know that in many activist circles that Black Lives Matters functions as a real, almost tangible entity. But, I know that that’s not what the social media post really meant. The post was getting at the sentiment that most people are wondering or have finally stopped caring about: why haven’t we heard from Black Lives Matter the way we did before the election of Donald Trump? I read this post and proceeded to climb up the intellectual mountain from which that question was generated–for whatever reason, when I wake up sometimes my mind brings a piercing alacrity to a thought–and I realized that there was a marked shift in how I personally discussed things and in how I engaged in this subjects in and around Black Lives Matter. In fact, I…

For Us, For Them

My parents and long time boyfriends parents both came from dictatorships. They came to this country for a better life. When you are shaking in your sleep on the verge of tears and hear Trump supporters outside of your walls celebrating, fear feels like something you have to make friends with. I don’t want to become my parents who lived in so much fear that even once they moved to the U.S it was hard to talk about the past. Worried that someone might be listening and make them disappear. Straightening their hair to cover up their blackness in hopes of not being noticed. I do not want to and refuse to live my life that way. I will not be living in fear although it seems that now more than ever I will be living WITH it. America was always the girl who passively bullied us in school. Made us feel like we weren’t good enough and taunted us for the things we could never control, but would always say it was a joke…

Your Life Matters

Originally posted on Doing Wells:
A Time to Mourn. I don’t often cry on my way to work. Normally it’s just a dull drive in, weaving between the slow drivers while trying not to get rear-ended by the fast ones. But this past week, I found myself sitting in traffic with a tear on my cheek. I was listening to a panel discussion at the Village Church. Pastor Matt Chandler was interviewing four African-American believers about how they reacted to the shootings in Minnesota, Baton Rouge, and frankly every state in America at this point. As they shared how they felt,  I found myself weeping with their pain. I guess I was fulfilling Romans 12:15: Weep with those who weep. In our world, this means we must weep with African-Americans AND with law enforcement officers. In our world, this means we must be weeping a lot. Almost unceasingly. Yet, it’s so easy to get callous toward these events. They’re happening so often, and the rapid fire of shooting tragedies has caused my heart to grow hard. To move on so…

So I Met a Guy on the Plane…

Originally posted on Travel Bugg :
I met a man on a flight to Frankfurt, and I think it may change my life. We were crammed in seats so far back you couldn’t see the moist towelettes and eye pillows of first class,  browsing through movie selections and trying not to make awkward elbow advances across the center rest, when a man from India asked me what I was planning to do in Germany. “I’m actually flying on to Budapest,” I told him, struggling to open the package of pretzels that international flights still give for free.  “And then I’m driving from Hungary to Slovakia.” “That will be a nice weekend trip,” he said as if he boarded planes to Europe every day. “What will you do there?” “I’m doing an photojournalism internship.” The phrase felt foreign; I kept pinching my arm fat to make sure it was really happening. I’d stopped telling friends and acquaintances about the position, afraid it would turn out to be a joke. I asked the man where he was going,…

Pornography Is a Social Justice Issue

Originally posted on Millennial:
Millennial Catholic Megan McCabe, who has written on hookup culture and rape culture at Millennial, has a new article at America. She writes: This process of desensitization and subsequent search for a new thrill is one way that male viewers find themselves aroused by acts of violence and degradation that they previously would have found horrifying. Through “Create in Me a Clean Heart,” the U.S.C.C.B. attempts to address these social concerns. But the statement mentions them only briefly and without much explanation. Despite addressing issues of violence, the overall framing of the document remains focused on lust and chastity. To take pornography seriously as a structure of sin would require moving violence to the fore, allowing it to frame how we ought to understand the ethical challenges posed by pornography. Through further exploration of the negative social effects of pornography, it becomes clear that the primary concern ought not be lustfulness. Rather, use of pornography entails complicity in a social structure that makes violence against women seem normal, even erotic. It…

Four ways to Heal the Social Justice/Pro-life Divide

Originally posted on Millennial:
Millennial writer  Mike Jordan Laskey has a new article at NCR. He writes: Accept “political homelessness” and live in the tension. John Carr, the former director of the U.S. bishops’ justice and peace department, uses the phrase “politically homeless” to describe where Catholicism’s consistent ethic of life leaves us. We might be “comfortable with neither Republican economic individualism, which measures everything by the market, nor with Democratic cultural individualism, which celebrates personal ‘choice’ above all else,” he wrote in America. “Neither form of libertarianism leaves enough room for the weak and vulnerable or the common good.” Political homelessness is hard! I’d love to feel content with either major party, and contribute to and vote for their candidates without thinking too much about it. I want to buy a t-shirt and go to a rally. I’d like to be a fan of the only presidential candidate to prominently feature a quote on economic injustice from Pope Francis on his website — Bernie Sanders — but the candidate’s perfect 100% rating from NARAL…

Hospitals shouldn’t be prisons: the case of Hannah G

Originally posted on Oh, the places you'll go :
So, typically in my posts I try for a little levity.  I find a few funny images or gifs to liven things up, and I try to keep everything as anonymous as possible. I’ve made a real effort not to show faces on this blog, because privacy is a right that is very hard to maintain in this digital age. Today, I’m taking a different route. This is Hannah G. Now, I want you to stop, and look at that picture for a second.  Keep looking. Little more.  Here, I’ll give you a couple more to help. Ok, good.  Keep that in mind while I tell you her story. So, on my summer Contiki, I met, ended up often rooming with and befriended another medical student. She was from the USA, and we bonded, as one does on a Contiki. We talked about our medical school experiences, and our families, and as such, I ended up hearing about her sister; Hannah G.  Now, Hannah sounded like a…

Content Warnings and Microaggressions

Originally posted on Painting On Scars:
(Image by Nicolas Raymond used under CC license via) ? There’s a heated debate going over at The Atlantic over trigger warnings and microaggressions. For those less familiar with online minority rights debates, trigger warnings originated as labels for video or texts depicting graphic violence, often sexual, that could be triggering for survivors of assault suffering from PTSD. They have since evolved into “content warnings,” used to label any video or text containing arguments, comments, humor or images that marginalize minorities. I most recently ran into one preceding a beer ad in which two brewers tried to joke about never wanting to have to do anything so humiliating as dressing in drag in the red-light district in order to earn money. Jonathan Haidt and Greg Lukianoff have argued that content warnings have led to “The Coddling of the American Mind,” a culture of silencing, wherein too many are afraid to initiate dialogue on these issues, lest they offend. They criticize restrictive speech codes and trigger warnings, and suggest universities…