All posts tagged: psychology

10 Signs of a Toxic Relationship

Originally posted on The Finicky Cynic:
When it comes to relationships, there are numerous ones which we develop over the course of our lives: familial, platonic, romantic. Some come and go throughout, and that’s okay– sometimes, it’s just life happening. However, there are the relationships which might not necessarily wan, but at the same time are not good for you. Known as “toxic relationships,” these are ones that no one should be in, as they can really mess with you. What makes it worse is that you might not even know that you’re in a toxic relationship, as the actions can be subtle, but over time wear you down. I’ll be honest: up until just a couple of years ago, I’ve been blessed to have had relationships which have been pretty good. Granted, some were short-lived or drifted away, but they have never been bad. It wasn’t until I got older that, the more people I met, that I started realizing that not everyone can get along with everyone, let alone be nice. Which is…

Why Minority Mental Health Is Important

Originally posted on Freud & Fashion:
As a psychiatrist who is also in therapy, I remember feeling misunderstood when it came to my culture as a filipino-american, but meant a lot to me to have my therapist express a genuine interest in understanding my culture and asking me for details regarding my experience.  Oftentimes I believe clinicians don’t prioritize someone’s identity (ethnicity, culture, religion, sexuality) when it comes to health, especially mental health, yet these factors play a significant role in someone’s values and way of life. July is Minority Mental Health Awareness Month and although today might be the last day, having knowledge of the disparities and struggles that several minorities experience is important if we’re going to eliminate stigma surrounding mental illness.  I consider myself as someone who prioritizes cultural competency, yet reading statistics and information regarding certain minorities surprised me and I was happy that this month existed and motivated me to read more about it.  Which is the reason why I’m sharing some of the following information with you here on my blog, in…

How Mental Illness Became a Light Instead of Darkness

Originally posted on Freud & Fashion:
Although yesterday marked the end of this year’s Mental Health Month, the discussion and efforts to raise awareness in order to break the stigma must remain a daily conversation.  So, I’m keeping the momentum going by featuring Brandon Ha, an amazing friend who also happens to be a kick ass mental health advocate and the creative director behind Break Yo Stigma, a social media campaign focused on breaking the shameful stigma of mental illness.  I first came across Brandon’s @breakyostigma Instagram page over a year ago when I was brainstorming ways to positively use social media for sharing my views on psychiatry.  The posts on @breakyostigma were bold, articulate, and uncensored when it came to the fallacies of our mental health system, and served as my inspiration to be more vocal about my own views via social media.  Therefore, I’m proud and excited to feature Brandon as a guest blogger as he discusses how his bipolar diagnosis ignited a drive to change the public’s views towards mental illness. _________________________ We all knew that one person in…

Unlocking the Secrets Behind Empathy

Originally posted on Weird and Wonderful:
Weird And Wonderful would love to explore the secrets of Empathy. I feel this is an ultimately important experience to write about, particularly when empathy is such a challenge for most individuals. This lead me to discover why and what part of the brain unlocks Empathy. The most amazing thing about empathy is being able to see the other person’s point of view. Being able to challenge the mind and feel those feelings – having the ability to come out with a reasonable and sound judgement or solution to the problem the other person is having. Are we trained as humans to be empathetic? I feel we are. It is not an easy emotion to have. The ones who are overly Empathetic can find it hard to actually be able to detach themselves from situations – especially when they have unleashed that part of their mind. I feel we can help one another out with this but I do think it is not a gift. I would love to…

These Disturbing Illustrations by Steve Cutts Expose the Sad Truth About Modern Society

Originally posted on Vasare Nar Art Fashion & Design blog:
A selection of the illustrations of Steve Cutts, who portrays with a bitter look the excesses of our sad modern world and of our consumer societies in some trash and offbeat satirical illustrations. In his illustrations he tries to show that work shouldn’t be a grinding, soul-crushing rat race for the almighty dollar. Consumerism shouldn’t hold a vice-like grip on our lives. And social media, well, we need to throw-off the shackles we so eagerly put on ourselves. Wouldn’t life be better then? Steve Cutts is an illustrator and animator from London. Faced with the choice of working at McDonalds or studying Fine Arts, he chose the latter. He worked at Glueisobar as the main storyboard concept artist before making the leap to freelance work. Cutts makes videos and images that criticize modern life – he states that insanity of humanity is an endless pool of inspiration. What are your thoughts ? Ironic thing is that we are all part of the loop. More or less. More…

Having Imaginary Friends and Talking to Yourself is a sign of Intelligence

Originally posted on Millennial Man:
Until recently, I had never told anyone that I have had about 2 or 3 imaginary friends my entire life.  Even more, I have always talked to myself.  I may be walking down the street and you may see me having a mild conversation with myself.  Or I may even be cussing angrily as I am getting off my car.  I was ashamed of having a couple of imaginary friends my entire life.  Also, I was ashamed of having conversations with myself in public.  Sometimes others will look at me, and they may even think I’m a meth addict that is just talking to himself, but that is not the case.  Recently, studies from Harvard and Stanford revealed that those who talk to themselves possess a high intellectual level.  Being able to have discussions out loud enables you to process your own decisions.  It allows you to be mindful and process your decision-making.  And even cussing in public makes me feel good.  When I am really angry for one issue…