All posts tagged: lit review

It’s Gucci

Originally posted on lipstickzngunz:
I’ll be honest with you guys, I put Gucci in a category. I just knew this book was gonna be hood as the West End Mall. I was thinking I’d need a translator to cypher through the slang. Pre judgment at it finest. I’m only human. I was sorta surprised when I notice Gucci himself was the author; after the first few chapters I quickly learned why. Well duh Lipstickzngunz its La Flare is a hustler. Thats the long and short of it. Period. Neil Martinez-Belkin former music editor at XXL magazine lent his expert touch as well. I mean since he’s written a ton about hip-hop why wouldn’t he. The rollercoaster ride of Mr. Burrrrrr starts out with humble well sorta humble beginnings deep in Alabama before we end up at the Texaco or Sun Valley, and long before Gucci becomes Atlanta Trap God. We meet his family and learn the meaning behind the name. After all none of us calls him Radric. I learned a bunch. So many Atlanta…

I’m Already Mentally Casting Emma Cline’s The Girls

Originally posted on couldreads:
On paper, Emma Cline is the kind of girl I want to punch. A?stylish waif with a successful?middle-part and piercing blue eyes. The owner of a near-monochromatic wardrobe that’s both simple and defiant in?its simplicity. The recipient of a $2 million advance, at the age of 25, for her first book (and two to come),?the end result of a bidding war between 12?major publishers. The author of a debut novel whose film rights were snapped up by Scott Rudin before the?manuscript even sold. Cline is living a charmed life, a romantic-comedy-set-in-Manhattan kind of life, an I-live-in-a-shed-for-the-novelty-of-it kind of life. I want to find her wherever she’s tapping away on her laptop at twee essays for vaunted?literary magazines and punch her right below that middle-part. There’s only one problem with this plan—several, if you count the unlikelihood?of my finding her shed or her even still living in the shed, or my managing to punch anyone in the face, arguably?unprovoked, without consequence. The problem is that The Girls, the novel loosely based on…

The Boy Most Likely To by Huntley Fitzpatrick // Much Cuteness & Much Teenage Angst

Originally posted on Book Enthral:
3 stars – I liked it but maybe there where elements of the book I didn’t enjoy to much and subtracted from the awesomeness. I may have also had a bit of a meh reaction to it. Surprises abound and sparks ignite in the highly anticipated, utterly romantic companion to My Life Next Door Tim Mason was The Boy Most Likely To: – find the liquor cabinet blindfolded – need a liver transplant – drive his car into a house Alice Garrett was The Girl Most Likely To: – well, not date her little brother’s baggage-burdened best friend, for starters. For Tim, it wouldn’t be smart to fall for Alice. For Alice, nothing could be scarier than falling for Tim. But Tim has never been known for making the smart choice, and Alice is starting to wonder if the “smart” choice is always the right one. When these two crash into each other, they crash hard. Then the unexpected consequences of Tim’s wild days come back to shock him. He finds…

Book Review #66 – Breakfast at Tiffany’s, by Truman Capote

Originally posted on Cat's Shelf:
Hey guys! Today’s post is going to be about Breakfast at Tiffany’s, by Truman Capote. Buy this book from Book Depository Recently I read another of Capote’s books, In Cold Blood (I posted my review here) and I totally feel in love with his writing. But before that, I found this beautiful (and super cheap, I might add) copy of Breakfast at Tiffany’s at a flea market, so I just bought it without thinking a lot. Unless you live under a rock, you’ve probably heard about the movie with the same name as this book, staring Audrey Hepburn. I mean, that’s probably what most people think about when they hear the tittle. Of course, this book contains that, but it’s not all. It also contains other short stories, like House of Flowers, A Diamond Guitar and A Christmas Memory. From what I can understand, most editions of this book contain the four stories. I read this when I was at a particular busy time in school but that didn’t stop me from…

Swan Boy

Originally posted on drinkingbooks:
Today I’m going to be talking about the beautiful Swan Boy by the wonderful Nikki Sheehan which is not released until 5th May 2016. I received a copy of Swan Boy via Rocktheboat (I also got a freaky awesome bookmark too!) in exchange for an honest review. And I can assure you this is an fantastic book! I gave it 5/5 Stars on goodreads. Firstly, here is a look at this gorgeous cover. From the cover I imagined the story to have something to do with Swans, a boy and London from the red bus. I was not wrong. Swan Boy is about a boy called Johnny who has recently moved from his home with his younger brother and mum after his dad sadly died unexpectedly. Normally a book with a young child in can be a bit… put off-ish. But Sheehan captured the essence of what being a kid is- pretending to be anything you want! Drawing on tables, being told its your bedtime (when really its like 5 hours…

Wolf by Wolf by Ryan Graudin

Originally posted on A frolic through fiction:
*All reviews I write are spoiler free* What a confusing title! Way too much repetition in those six words. I finished reading this book on Wednesday, but since I uploaded my discussion post that day, I saved my review for today. Also having wolves as my favourite animal and being quite artistic came in handy when I needed a background for the review image, since I had this painting I did years ago stuck to my wall! Ahhaha 😀 So let’s talk about Wolf by Wolf! Title: Wolf by Wolf Author: Ryan Graudin Publisher: Indigo Series Status: The first in the Wolf by Wolf series (others yet to be released) Number of Pages: 379 My Rating: 4/5 stars!    (Found on Goodreads) Once upon a different time, there was a girl who lived in a kingdom of death. Wolves howled up her arm. A whole pack of them-made of tattoo ink and pain, memory and loss. It was the only thing about her that ever stayed the same.Her story…

Book Review: The Dinner

Originally posted on The Farm on the Hill:
“Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” -Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina If you knew that your child had committed a heinous crime, what would you do?  How far would you go to protect them?  And what would you do to the person that threatened to expose them?  The characters in Herman Koch’s The Dinner must answer all of these questions. The narrator, Paul, takes you through an entire evening of dinner with his wife, brother and sister-in-law from the apertif to the digestif.  It is at this dinner that the four must decide how to handle the fact that their boys have committed an awful crime.  Throw in sibling rivalry, a prime minister campaign, and a little marital drama and you have an interesting book. I wanted to read this book because I LOVED Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn, who is quoted on the front cover.  It was the first book where I abhorred both main characters but still could not put…