All posts tagged: bookworm

Oathbringer

Originally posted on Life of Chaz:
Oathbringer by Brandon Sanderson Amazon – Oathbringer GoodReads – Oathbringer Author – Brandon Sanderson Dalinar Kholin’s Alethi armies won a fleeting victory at a terrible cost: The enemy Parshendi summoned the violent Everstorm, which now sweeps the world with destruction, and in its passing awakens the once peaceful and subservient parshmen to the horror of their millennia-long enslavement by humans. While on a desperate flight to warn his family of the threat, Kaladin Stormblessed must come to grips with the fact that the newly kindled anger of the parshmen may be wholly justified. Nestled in the mountains high above the storms, in the tower city of Urithiru, Shallan Davar investigates the wonders of the ancient stronghold of the Knights Radiant and unearths dark secrets lurking in its depths. And Dalinar realizes that his holy mission to unite his homeland of Alethkar was too narrow in scope. Unless all the nations of Roshar can put aside Dalinar’s blood-soaked past and stand together–and unless Dalinar himself can confront that past–even the restoration…

Swallow

Originally posted on LITERARY TITAN:
There are many words that can be used to describe the tale of Swallow by Heidi Fischer. Gripping. Moving. Heart-breaking. This fantastic story about a young woman in World War Two era Germany humanizes those who fought in the war in a way that is unexpected. Our story follows Gabi: a fierce, bright woman who stampedes her way onto the runway where she acts as an engineer and pilot. In a time where woman were beginning to make their mark on the world; a time when relations are strained and many outside the Nazi mantra failed to truly understand what was happening in their country. Gabi finds herself in all of this. The bright young woman who had her life altered so horrifically at the tender age of seven. The young woman who wants to do her father, a general, proud. Gabi shows us a Germany that many of us wouldn’t have believed existed. The desire of a young woman to fly. This book starts off with a bang and…

Book Review: The Tea Planter’s Wife by Dinah Jefferies

When I saw this book on the fiction shelves in Borders, I knew I must have it. The cover was attractive enough, the back of the book told me enough to know roughly what the story would be about, and also because I’ve begun drinking tea (Lipton, to be exact) more so than coffee. Of course, what you read on the back of a book cover can barely tell you much but it can give you an inkling into what to expect from it. Where there is love and romance, there would be secrets and a likelihood of a betrayal or two. It was enough for me to pay for the book and leave. It took me four days to finish reading The Tea Planter’s Wife by Dinah Jefferies. Four days. It’s not as short as I thought, but for me, finishing a book in less than a week is a good achievement. The last time I ever recalled having finished reading an entire book in a day or two, or staying up way past midnight …

The A-Z (or Y) of a Book Lover’s Glossary

Who else agrees with me on this? That no matter where we are, it will always feel like we have been transported to a new destination whenever we pick up a book to read. I feel that way all the time when I had my nose buried between the pages of a book. Carlos Ruiz Zafon took me to the olden days of Barcelona. Cathy Kelly brought me through the streets of Ireland. Elif Shafak was my tour guide in Turkey and Istanbul. And now, Jimmy Carter is wading through the murky waters with me in Georgia, Philadelphia, and Florida. Even though I was never physically there in those places. That’s it, feel the gentle bookish breeze stroking your mind and stoking your imagination. In the meantime, all this reading and bookish fever have prompted within me to draw up a glossary list (with a short caption for each letter) that most (and many) readers can relate to, although these alphabetical terms are more personal to me than to the masses: A – Adventure New travel …

I’m Already Mentally Casting Emma Cline’s The Girls

Originally posted on Sorry Television:
On paper, Emma Cline is the kind of girl I want to punch. A?stylish waif with a successful?middle-part and piercing blue eyes. The owner of a near-monochromatic wardrobe that’s both simple and defiant in?its simplicity. The recipient of a $2 million advance, at the age of 25, for her first book (and two to come),?the end result of a bidding war between 12?major publishers. The author of a debut novel whose film rights were snapped up by Scott Rudin before the?manuscript even sold. Cline is living a charmed life, a romantic-comedy-set-in-Manhattan kind of life, an I-live-in-a-shed-for-the-novelty-of-it kind of life. I want to find her wherever she’s tapping away on her laptop at twee essays for vaunted?literary magazines and punch her right below that middle-part. There’s only one problem with this plan—several, if you count the unlikelihood?of my finding her shed or her even still living in the shed, or my managing to punch anyone in the face, arguably?unprovoked, without consequence. The problem is that The Girls, the novel loosely based…

Discussion Post: Characters With Absent Parents

Originally posted on A frolic through fiction:
Now, I apologize in advance if this discussion seems slightly more like a rant on my part. But I’ve discovered that I actually have quite a lot to say about this topic. Not long ago, someone talked about this topic, and when commenting on their post, I saw that I was actually quite passionate about this – rant wise. I have a lot to say, and I need to get it out there somehow, so this is the topic of today’s discussion post. So let’s talk about characters with absent parents! I feel like every single protagonist in most YA books is missing either one of both parents. And I just want to know…WHY??? Why on earth has it become a book trope for someone to be missing their parents? I find it so wrong that it’s been written this way so often that it’s actually a trope now! I feel like lately, people just write out the parents of the protagonist for convenience. Because how inconvenient would…

The Boy Most Likely To by Huntley Fitzpatrick // Much Cuteness & Much Teenage Angst

Originally posted on Book Enthral:
3 stars – I liked it but maybe there where elements of the book I didn’t enjoy to much and subtracted from the awesomeness. I may have also had a bit of a meh reaction to it. Surprises abound and sparks ignite in the highly anticipated, utterly romantic companion to My Life Next Door Tim Mason was The Boy Most Likely To: – find the liquor cabinet blindfolded – need a liver transplant – drive his car into a house Alice Garrett was The Girl Most Likely To: – well, not date her little brother’s baggage-burdened best friend, for starters. For Tim, it wouldn’t be smart to fall for Alice. For Alice, nothing could be scarier than falling for Tim. But Tim has never been known for making the smart choice, and Alice is starting to wonder if the “smart” choice is always the right one. When these two crash into each other, they crash hard. Then the unexpected consequences of Tim’s wild days come back to shock him. He finds…

Book Review #66 – Breakfast at Tiffany’s, by Truman Capote

Originally posted on Cat's Shelf:
Hey guys! Today’s post is going to be about Breakfast at Tiffany’s, by Truman Capote. Buy this book from Book Depository Recently I read another of Capote’s books, In Cold Blood (I posted my review here) and I totally feel in love with his writing. But before that, I found this beautiful (and super cheap, I might add) copy of Breakfast at Tiffany’s at a flea market, so I just bought it without thinking a lot. Unless you live under a rock, you’ve probably heard about the movie with the same name as this book, staring Audrey Hepburn. I mean, that’s probably what most people think about when they hear the tittle. Of course, this book contains that, but it’s not all. It also contains other short stories, like House of Flowers, A Diamond Guitar and A Christmas Memory. From what I can understand, most editions of this book contain the four stories. I read this when I was at a particular busy time in school but that didn’t stop me from…