All posts tagged: book lovers

A Subway With Its Own Library

Originally posted on cup of tea with that book, please:
Credit: The New York Times ? Ever left your house without your book and was facing a long commute to work? Now New Yorkers don’t have to face that dreaded outcome. The New York Public Library, Queens Public Library, and Brooklyn Public Library, in partnership with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) created a great reading project titled “Subway Library”, free ebooks for your ever daunting commute. These are free downloadable books excerpts or full text that can be accessed through the libraries’ e-reader app, the SimplyE. This is how it works: When you enter any subway station, connect to the Transit Wireless WiFi Once logged on, you’ll see a prompt to go and visit SubwayLibrary.com And start browsing! They have various categories ranging from “New York Stories” to “International Tales”. It also organized books for those rare quick commutes or long reads for that ever daily occurring long/delayed commutes. And don’t forget to lookout for the “library” train! This train has 10 subway cars covered to…

The A-Z (or Y) of a Book Lover’s Glossary

Who else agrees with me on this? That no matter where we are, it will always feel like we have been transported to a new destination whenever we pick up a book to read. I feel that way all the time when I had my nose buried between the pages of a book. Carlos Ruiz Zafon took me to the olden days of Barcelona. Cathy Kelly brought me through the streets of Ireland. Elif Shafak was my tour guide in Turkey and Istanbul. And now, Jimmy Carter is wading through the murky waters with me in Georgia, Philadelphia, and Florida. Even though I was never physically there in those places. That’s it, feel the gentle bookish breeze stroking your mind and stoking your imagination. In the meantime, all this reading and bookish fever have prompted within me to draw up a glossary list (with a short caption for each letter) that most (and many) readers can relate to, although these alphabetical terms are more personal to me than to the masses: A – Adventure New travel …

The Boy Most Likely To by Huntley Fitzpatrick // Much Cuteness & Much Teenage Angst

Originally posted on Book Enthral:
3 stars – I liked it but maybe there where elements of the book I didn’t enjoy to much and subtracted from the awesomeness. I may have also had a bit of a meh reaction to it. Surprises abound and sparks ignite in the highly anticipated, utterly romantic companion to My Life Next Door Tim Mason was The Boy Most Likely To: – find the liquor cabinet blindfolded – need a liver transplant – drive his car into a house Alice Garrett was The Girl Most Likely To: – well, not date her little brother’s baggage-burdened best friend, for starters. For Tim, it wouldn’t be smart to fall for Alice. For Alice, nothing could be scarier than falling for Tim. But Tim has never been known for making the smart choice, and Alice is starting to wonder if the “smart” choice is always the right one. When these two crash into each other, they crash hard. Then the unexpected consequences of Tim’s wild days come back to shock him. He finds…

Book Review #66 – Breakfast at Tiffany’s, by Truman Capote

Originally posted on Cat's Shelf:
Hey guys! Today’s post is going to be about Breakfast at Tiffany’s, by Truman Capote. Buy this book from Book Depository Recently I read another of Capote’s books, In Cold Blood (I posted my review here) and I totally feel in love with his writing. But before that, I found this beautiful (and super cheap, I might add) copy of Breakfast at Tiffany’s at a flea market, so I just bought it without thinking a lot. Unless you live under a rock, you’ve probably heard about the movie with the same name as this book, staring Audrey Hepburn. I mean, that’s probably what most people think about when they hear the tittle. Of course, this book contains that, but it’s not all. It also contains other short stories, like House of Flowers, A Diamond Guitar and A Christmas Memory. From what I can understand, most editions of this book contain the four stories. I read this when I was at a particular busy time in school but that didn’t stop me from…

Jane and the Waterloo Map by Stephanie Barron Blog Tour + GIVEAWAY

Originally posted on Reflections of a Book Addict:
When I was first asked to join the blog tour for Jane and the Waterloo Map by Stephanie Barron, I was super excited. It’s been a while since I’ve read the other books in the Jane Austen Mysteries series, but I remember loving the idea of Jane Austen as a sleuth. It’s obvious that Jane was observant in real life, as her observations and commentary on the societal events of the day were both astute and very progressive. Therefore it’s not exactly a stretch to think that she would be observant enough to solve mysteries. From the great success that Barron has had so far, it’s clear that many other people agree with me and have loved to see Jane in this new and exciting role. This time we follow Jane as she embarks on an exciting treasure hunt that has very dangerous and real implications. (Below the book blurb and author bio are giveaway instructions so you can win your own copy!) Book Blurb: November, 1815. The…

How I use the 5-Star rating system on Goodreads

Originally posted on The Fault in Our Blogs:
Most book reviewers believe in some way that rating all books on the same scale of 1 to 5 is messy. For example, what am I supposed to do when I just read a really good fantasy book that is nothing like any of the literary fiction picks that dominate my shelves? What do those five stars even MEAN? Why are there only five? Why is rating books even important? Over time I stopped putting 1 to 5 ratings on my blog reviews, because I think the definition of what those stars mean varies too much from person to person. What I use the star ratings for is very specific and probably doesn’t matter much to most of my readers. On goodreads, when you’re asked to give your review, you can mouse over the stars and see what each tier is supposed to mean: One star is “did not like it” Two stars is “it was ok” Three stars is “liked it” Four is “really liked it”…

22 Moments Book Lovers Know All Too Well

Originally posted on Junkies Literarios:
Because the struggle is real… By @TheLiteraryMomo 1. When you find yourself at a crossroads. 2. But then you realize, It’s a brand new book, and you’re reading it for the first time. 3. So instead, you take on the guilty pleasure of book sniffing. 4. And suddenly you remember… you haven’t taken off the price label! 5. And now you’re good to go, but you can’t find a comfortable enough position for reading. 6. When you finally find one, it’s in bed and this happens. 7. So you get really into the story and notice the new protagonist/love interest is a total dreamboat. 8. And then you feel so in sync with the author that you catch on the plot twists before they happen. 9. And all you want to do is finish the book that you start neglecting other responsibilities. 10. And everyone just keeps interrupting you… 11. And then you notice that you weren’t as in sync with the author as you thought and your potential OCD…

A Tale Of Two Brothers – R.K.Narayan And R.K.Laxman

Originally posted on Scribbling Owlet:
NOTE: I know you all must be confused as to why I am posting old posts now? Well, these are posts from my erstwhile blog (sounds so royal) and I have had people read them last year. But to my new readers, these are fresh posts and I don’t want them to miss out on any book related posts 🙂 So I will be re-posting random blogs, which some of you might have already read. Today, 10th October happens to be the birthday of one of the most prominent literary figures in India – R.K.Narayan. I am pretty sure that if you grew up studying in an English medium school, you couldn’t  possibly have escaped his stories in the curriculum. Or at the very least, you couldn’t have missed watching Malgudi days on TV and going through stories so wonderfully penned by him. I can also proudly say that Indian literature in English would be incomplete without his contributions. From what I have read of his works and remember, his prose was…