All posts tagged: Black

It’s Gucci

Originally posted on lipstickzngunz:
I’ll be honest with you guys, I put Gucci in a category. I just knew this book was gonna be hood as the West End Mall. I was thinking I’d need a translator to cypher through the slang. Pre judgment at it finest. I’m only human. I was sorta surprised when I notice Gucci himself was the author; after the first few chapters I quickly learned why. Well duh Lipstickzngunz its La Flare is a hustler. Thats the long and short of it. Period. Neil Martinez-Belkin former music editor at XXL magazine lent his expert touch as well. I mean since he’s written a ton about hip-hop why wouldn’t he. The rollercoaster ride of Mr. Burrrrrr starts out with humble well sorta humble beginnings deep in Alabama before we end up at the Texaco or Sun Valley, and long before Gucci becomes Atlanta Trap God. We meet his family and learn the meaning behind the name. After all none of us calls him Radric. I learned a bunch. So many Atlanta…

5 Black Hockey Players You Might Not Know Exist

Originally posted on TheCollective:
Hockey has often been seen as pretty much a middle-class, white people sport, but the times, they are a-changing. While the majority of players are Canadian, European and (sometimes even) American anglos, there are a number of Black hockey players scattered across the NHL, if you know or care to look. In honor of Black History Month, I’ve put together a list of my top 5 favorite black hockey players of all nationalities for purely altruistic reasons, of course. xoxo C. Diva Just all about hockey over on  Twitter and Tumblr. Seriously. P.k. Subban Born: May 13, 1989 (age 26), Toronto, Canada Current teams: Montreal Canadiens (#76 / Defenseman), Canadian National Men’s Hockey Team (#76 / Defenseman) Pernell Karl “P. K.” Subban is a Canadian professional ice hockey defenceman and an alternate captain for the Montreal Canadiens of the National Hockey League. P.K. is adorable and one of my favorite players, not just because he’s great at hockey, but because he’s a strong, black man who is passionate about service and the hockey community. Oh, and also,…

Transcending America: How Russell Westbrook, Odell Beckham and Cameron Newton Have Changed Black Masculinity

Originally posted on Joshua Lawrence Lazard:
It’s time for a new black male aesthetic.   Especially one that captures decolonized postmodern black masculinity as well as one that has ontologically transcendent capabilities.  In simpler terms, an aesthetic that allows for black masculinity to not be defined by archaic norms in the realm of fashion, black male-to-male relationships and how one images themselves for the sake of respectability politics. The year 2012 was significant for black male masculinity on several fronts, far too many to discuss here, many of which were around how black men were entering public conversations about black women and black male privilege in social media spheres, to the way that black urban fashion had shed much of its nascent hip hop bagginess trading it in for fitted and skinny jeans, Obama was running for re-election, same-sex marriage in black religious circles was a hot-button topic as the president came out in favor of it, more and more young people were freer to talk about sex and sexuality and at the same time the demographic remained woefully…

An Open Letter to Hollywood

Originally posted on Black Millennials:
Viola Davis put forth a call to action that Hollywood be more intentional in giving women of color — especially Black women — more critical roles. Here’s some steps Hollywood could take towards that aim. By Britt Spruill  Hello, Hollywood. While accepting her historic win at the Emmys this weekend, High Priestess Viola Davis confronted you regarding the lack of acting roles for Women of Color. “The only thing that separates women of color from anyone else is opportunity. You cannot win an Emmy for roles that are simply not there,” Davis remarked in her passionate speech. Her words come after the recent “whitesplaining” of diversity from actor/director Matt Damon, insisting there is a certain time and place for such matters. He’s obviously wrong in so many ways, but Davis isn’t …and you know it. I urge you to heed her words and take action to close this tragic and unfortunate opportunity gap. As a fat kid, I didn’t really go outside much growing up, so I spent most of my childhood…

We’re Black in Havana, and Still Can’t Breathe

Originally posted on Black Millennials:
By Jasmine Hall and Moriah Ray Displaced: to force someone to leave their home, typically because of war, persecution, or natural disasters. This war being waged on black bodies is resulting in our persecution, and there is nothing natural about this disaster. It is methodological, institutionalized and heavily funded.   As we entered our embassy, which is supposed to serve as our “safe haven,” we found ourselves displaced. As we nervously walked through a barrage of bulletproof doors and body scanners, the face of a black man on the wall – our Commander in Chief – provided us momentary relief before we entered the main lobby. There, we were reminded of the threat that black women pose to the system. Posted on the edifice walls, we saw nothing more than a freedom fighting black women labeled a “TERRORIST.” She fought – and continues to fight – against the system so we can breathe. One million dollar reward for anyone who could return the women in “traditional African clothing” who was…

Black British Girlhood

Originally posted on BLK GRRRL BOOK FAIR:
Art by Pearl Ivy Some of BlkGrrrl’s favorite voices on the African Diaspora are from the United Kingdom. While their size compared to the white population in the UK is smaller than in the United States, their perspective offers a diverse look of the Black experience outside the continent of Africa. In many ways it seems that the Black British Grrrl experience is more diverse in the UK than in the US. Today we’re looking at the summer London exhibit Black British Girlhood. The curator of the event is Bekke Popoola who in an article in IC3 magazine describes herself as, “Almost British, almost Nigerian.” ?Popoola is a graphic artist who was born-and-raised in East London. Bekke Popoola: What inspired the name of the exhibit Black British Girlhood? #BlkGrrrl: It was inspired by a friend called Deborah aka DJ Pepper-Coast posting her diary on Tumblr from when she was 8-years-old. Sparked a lot of nostalgia and I came up with the name Black British Girlhood.?Me, Olivia and Kariima…

No, Winnie: I Don’t Feel “Loved” When White People Steal Our Culture

Originally posted on Black Millennials:
Le sigh. This weekend was one of healing. I got over 20 hours of sleep, lined my pockets in overtime pay, and cleaned up both my room and iTunes library to perfection. I woke up this morning feeling refreshed and re-nourished. And then I came across a debilitating article that reminded me that, despite my restful weekend, I still live in a world where the most oppressed of us lack personal ownership, cultural authority, or a critical analysis that centers our existence with no apology or compromise. Winnie Harlow, the Canadian-born Black model who lives with vitiligo — a chronic skin condition that causes discoloration — took a major L in dopeness when she (basically) said that cultural appropriation is a sign of love, unicorns, and rainbows. Ever since gaining international recognition as a conspicuous standout in an industry notorious for its eurocentric beauty standards, Winnie Harlow has become a martyr of sorts — with many viewing her ascension and visibility as a mark against the suffocating status quo. Some…

An Open Letter to Everyone

Originally posted on Black Millennials:
I am deeply in Love with Black People. And that makes me dangerous. My Love for Black People is not like regular love. My Love isn’t like the love I have for Harry Potter, hot sauce, or beer. My Love for Black People is something else entirely — rooted in an ancestral well of cultural traditions and decentralized mythologies that I will never have the capacity to holistically understand. My Love for Black People is a Love that I can’t, in this moment, explore with brevity, thoroughness, or accuracy. My Love for Black People comes from my Love of Blackness. Where whiteness is a system of destruction, Blackness is a celestial spirit of Connection, Resiliency, Resistance, Majesty, Artistry, and overall Cultural Craftsmanship. Blackness does not need whiteness for its ethereal existence, and thrives in spite of it. Whiteness relies on Blackness for its survival. Ironically, as Blackness thrives in its innovation and adaptation, whiteness adapts to encroach upon it. Whiteness takes the parts of Blackness that can be manufactured and…

The Scary Gangsters of South Central Los Angeles

Originally posted on BLK GRRRL BOOK FAIR:
By Teka Lark In South Central Los Angeles there is a gang war going on, but not the one they are writing about. There will be #100days100nights of terror, because every day a person gets foreclosed on in South Central. Everyday a person loses their job and every day someone joins the ranks of our over 50,000 homeless. Houses in Watts are creeping towards $300.000 houses on the old Eastside of South L.A. are creeping towards $500,000. Those areas area in Los Angeles are prime investment spots. South LA is close to downtown LA, by the freeways, the beach and by the University of Southern California. The story here isn’t so much different than the stories unfolding in Detroit, Oakland, San Francisco and New York. The banks, the developers and the politicians —they pay, want people in South Central out of their houses. We vote too much, we talk too much and we ask too many questions. This isn’t some random gang war, violence is never random and…