All posts tagged: Black Millennials

Transcending America: How Russell Westbrook, Odell Beckham and Cameron Newton Have Changed Black Masculinity

Originally posted on Joshua Lawrence Lazard:
It’s time for a new black male aesthetic.   Especially one that captures decolonized postmodern black masculinity as well as one that has ontologically transcendent capabilities.  In simpler terms, an aesthetic that allows for black masculinity to not be defined by archaic norms in the realm of fashion, black male-to-male relationships and how one images themselves for the sake of respectability politics. The year 2012 was significant for black male masculinity on several fronts, far too many to discuss here, many of which were around how black men were entering public conversations about black women and black male privilege in social media spheres, to the way that black urban fashion had shed much of its nascent hip hop bagginess trading it in for fitted and skinny jeans, Obama was running for re-election, same-sex marriage in black religious circles was a hot-button topic as the president came out in favor of it, more and more young people were freer to talk about sex and sexuality and at the same time the demographic remained woefully…

Selective Outrage Won’t Get Us Free

Originally posted on Black Millennials:
Jamar Clark was killed execution-style while handcuffed in Minneapolis. Black activists most notably affiliated with the local Black Lives Matter chapter and the local NAACP shut down highways and occupied the 4th police precinct. National media is starting to pick up on the local unrest, especially after white supremacist terrorists shot five Black Lives Matter protestors. In Chicago, video released shows LaQuan McDonald being shot some sixteen times by a white police officer. His murderer has been charged, and thousands are mobilizing. Traditional media is focusing on the clashes between protesters and police, while social media is aflame. The gruesome video (which I admittedly haven’t watched) lives on the pages of many. Heated debate about the discomfiting consumption of Black death and pain is — once again — underway. Not one to homogenize Black murder and resulting unrest, I can’t help but draw striking parallels to Ferguson and Baltimore. From the expansive number of mass mobilizations and frontline energies, to the tweets of solidarity, frenetic live-streaming, and the viciously heavy-handed responses…

Black Lives Matter Demands a Presidential Racial Justice Debate

Originally posted on Black Millennials:
Black Lives Matter activists demand a DNC debate centering racial justice issues. Sign our Color of Change petition. It’s abundantly clear that a Democratic presidential debate solely focusing on racial justice issues is needed. The candidates can barely say “Black Lives Matter” without cringing, are mincing their words to appeal to those low-income centrist white voters residing in crucial swing states, and can hardly articulate a cohesive pro-Black platform that captures the state of emergency that Black lives currently exist in. The undertaking to perform in a racial justice debate is a daunting one. For the last few decades, the Democratic Establishment regarded the Black vote as a given. But now, as resurgent radicalism is reshaping the national pro-Black politic, Black voters are more aware that the Democratic Establishment colludes with the very systems and institutions that cripple, undermine, target, and brutalize Black bodies. From welfare reform, to tough crime laws and neoliberalism, the Democratic Party has aided in locking us in the socioeconomic underclass. And that’s exactly why this debate needs to…

An Open Letter to Hollywood

Originally posted on Black Millennials:
Viola Davis put forth a call to action that Hollywood be more intentional in giving women of color — especially Black women — more critical roles. Here’s some steps Hollywood could take towards that aim. By Britt Spruill  Hello, Hollywood. While accepting her historic win at the Emmys this weekend, High Priestess Viola Davis confronted you regarding the lack of acting roles for Women of Color. “The only thing that separates women of color from anyone else is opportunity. You cannot win an Emmy for roles that are simply not there,” Davis remarked in her passionate speech. Her words come after the recent “whitesplaining” of diversity from actor/director Matt Damon, insisting there is a certain time and place for such matters. He’s obviously wrong in so many ways, but Davis isn’t …and you know it. I urge you to heed her words and take action to close this tragic and unfortunate opportunity gap. As a fat kid, I didn’t really go outside much growing up, so I spent most of my childhood…

The Rise and Fall of Iggy Azalea

Originally posted on Black Millennials:
T.I. has finally parted ways?with his breakout star.?What took him so long? In 2011, when radio and television personality Charlamagne Tha God said that Iggy Azalea — then a fresh off the success of “Pussy” — was gonna be a star, I scoffed. Where he saw potential, I saw an explicit marketing ploy with little sustainability or long term success. Iggy Azalea featured on the venerable XXL Freshman cover (2012) I saw the gentrification of hip hop where white artists with some edge would be pushed before audiences before the audience pushed back. I saw cultural appropriation and cooptation, inauthenticity, and an obvious — if not desperate — attempt to turn a quick profit. While I was clear in my interpretation of the Australian born rapper, others were not. “Fancy,” her record breaking single, dominated airwaves in 2014. Clear Channel, the biggest radio outlet in the country, included her in their “On The Verge” program, an initiative designed to give emerging artists optimal exposure to some 245 million monthly listeners.…