All posts tagged: America

For Us, For Them

My parents and long time boyfriends parents both came from dictatorships. They came to this country for a better life. When you are shaking in your sleep on the verge of tears and hear Trump supporters outside of your walls celebrating, fear feels like something you have to make friends with. I don’t want to become my parents who lived in so much fear that even once they moved to the U.S it was hard to talk about the past. Worried that someone might be listening and make them disappear. Straightening their hair to cover up their blackness in hopes of not being noticed. I do not want to and refuse to live my life that way. I will not be living in fear although it seems that now more than ever I will be living WITH it. America was always the girl who passively bullied us in school. Made us feel like we weren’t good enough and taunted us for the things we could never control, but would always say it was a joke…

California | A Study

Originally posted on Natalie Breuer:
 Follow my instagram for more of the above photos  Dear Reader, If you’ve been reading my blog for any period of time, you likely know my opinion on California is not very favorable. That being said, I am here until I leave for France (next week!!) and have been trying my hardest to see the best in everything. In a turn of events, I have succeeded to an extent thanks to my newfound addiction to film photography. I’ve spent the last couple of weeks taking pictures of things I find beautiful here (feat. my incredible friend and muse Shawn/love for neon signs). I hope you find them beautiful too. And in other news, I posted a new playlist to the Music Forum last night ~ as always, music suggestions are very, very welcome!!  Instagram  ~  Facebook Page   ~   Twitter   ~   Tumblr   ~   Bloglovin   ~   Pinterest XX, The Girl in the Little Black Dress

Do the Thing That Scares You

Originally posted on Travel Bugg :
Baldy Peak on Mount Livermore in the Davis Mountains, West Texas. Courtesy Photo / Jenise Zuidema What do you get when you take 35 strangers with varying levels of outdoors experience, lead them into the wilds of West Texas, and ask them to primitive camp on a trail that isn’t usually open to the public? Pure mountain magic. What should have been a logistical nightmare, ended up being one of the best experiences of my life. Climbing Mount Livermore in the Davis Mountains of West Texas. Courtesy Photo / Jenise Zuidema For the past few years, I’ve had a mantra running through my head: “do the thing that scares you.” Since I was young, I’ve been terrified of falling. It didn’t matter if it was slipping down a mountain or the skating rink at the mall. My feet would tingle just watching movies with characters standing on high objects. I couldn’t even watch the scene in “Forrest Gump”when Jenny is contemplating jumping from a building. I used to be afraid…

Slacktivism: How powerful is online activism?

Originally posted on The Scribble Bug:
Slacktivism is a funny little hybrid word – a portmanteau of ‘slacker’ and ‘activism’.  It applies to ‘actions taken to bring about political or social change but requiring only minimal commitment, effort, or risk’, but more generally referring to the casual liking or retweeting of political or issue-led content online in lieu of mobilising IRL. Over the last two years it’s received a serious amount of mixed press. On the one hand, it’s drawing attention to campaigns and causes that need them. On the other, slacktivism carries a pejorative undertone – implies people are interacting online to look good or feel good rather than actually engaging or committing to a cause. Is this all it is? Is it just a lot of talk but not a lot of do?  As a digital native who often finds themselves writing about activism – in particular those related to climate change, mental health, and equality – this is something that has increasingly bothered me. And you know me – if something causes a bother then it’s time to ask some questions and find…

Exploring Connecticut: Kent Falls

Originally posted on The Picky Eater Travels:
I recently went to Kent Falls located in Kent, Connecticut with my friend, and I visit here about 2 times a year in the warmer months. However, with all the nice weather recently I decided to be daring and visit during February. Looking back at it, that might have been a bit of a mistake. First of all, there was ice all around where the falls was so you couldn’t walk directly to the bottom of the falls unless you want to look like a penguin sliding on your stomach all the way to the falls. Even some of the stone steps were covered in ice, but it made it a little easier with a hand rail there to hold on to. And lastly, I almost got lost in the woods because of all the rain recently there was mud everywhere on the other side of the trail so it made it difficult to spot the trail or to even cross it. However, this seems like something that…

The Paradox Of Expectations

Originally posted on A Couple Talks:
Oh WordPress, how I’ve missed you. Actually, no, I haven’t. I’ll come clean; I almost forgot the password to this?account. Guess you’re our illegitimate stepchild after all. We go into blogging with the mindset that we’ll keep it up and post regularly. I mean, c’mon, surely we have at least fifteen minutes a day that we can spare to blog, right? Right? No, we do not. We’re too busy watching the same Vine loop a thousand times on our phone or stalking our ex-lover, ex-friend, ex-coworker, ex-whatever on Facebook. If you’re new to blogging, just know this: one day you’ll hate blogging. I listened to a podcast episode of NPR’s Hidden Brain the other day. This episode featured Aziz Ansari, and they discussed a concept known as the paradox of choice. We love having options, but is there such a thing as having too many options? I do get frustrated when I can’t decide on an entree at a restaurant that has a million dishes to choose from, as…

D.C. Days: The Capital in Under 48 Hours

Originally posted on Erin Leigh Ever After:
A big problem about catching the travel bug is being 22 and broke. A quick-fix solution for this is to keep your trips short and sweet. This sparked the two-day trip to Washington D.C. my boyfriend Nick and I took this fall. Luckily, we live within driving distance (about two and a half hours), which of course saves tons on travel costs! We got there on a Saturday morning and left by Sunday night, but had a awesome, activity packed two days in the nation’s capital. After sitting in traffic most of the morning I finally got into D.C. and met Nick (who was coming from school in Virginia) at The MadHatter. The restaurant was unsurprisingly decked out in all things Alice in Wonderland, but in an almost subtle way that wasn’t completely overwhelming. I didn’t feel like I was in Disneyland; instead there was an assortment of portraits and memorabilia of Alice and the gang along the wood-paneled walls, which I absolutely loved! After a waffle-filled and lovely brunch, we headed over to…

Home Alone is 25 Years Old! Here is a Delightful Oral History

Originally posted on The Nostalgia Blog:
This is a delightful oral history of what I think is safe to say my generation’s all time favorite Christmas movie, Home Alone (all due respect to National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation). The piece is written by James Hughes (son of Home Alone writer, John Hughes) for Chicago magazine which is fitting as the film took place “on the most boring street in the whole United States of America, where nothing even remotely dangerous will ever happen.” which happens to be in Chicago. If you aren’t familiar with oral histories, they are in my opinion the best way to recount stories (especially in the entertainment industry). The reason they are so good is that it is the people involved just recount their versions of what happens which usually makes for a more interesting read. The article is full of fun anecdotes and delightful stories, so please, grab a whole cheese pizza, sit down and enjoy reading this oral history…ya filthy animals. link to oral history found below: http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/December-2015/Home-Alone/

My Top Ten Bucketlist Moments

Originally posted on The Wanderlust Times:
I owe some of my most treasured memories to travel. Theres a reason I’m so obsessed with seeing the world, and I smile every time I look back at these moments in particular. I was most likely thinking something along the lines of “I love my life” at the time. Cycling over the Golden Gate Bridge Thoughts when cycling over the bridge: “Wow, it’s really windy. And cold… isn’t it supposed to be summer? There are more people on this bridge than cars. Stay on your side pedestrians!” Thoughts when having to get up the hill to this view point: “I can’t cycle up that thing. I’m going to try…. Ok I’m walking the bike up.” But it was worth every second. With beautiful views of the city whilst going over the bridge and once up this hill, there were even better views. On that day I grew a strong appreciation for humanity and the beautiful things we create. Here’s a list of some of the best places to view the bridge.…